aka

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See also: Aka, AKA, A.K.A., åka, akā, āķa, a/k/a, and a.k.a.

English[edit]

Preposition[edit]

aka

  1. Alternative capitalization of AKA.

Anagrams[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse aka (to move, to drive) from the Proto-Indo-European *h₂eǵ-. Cognates include the Latin agō, the Ancient Greek ἄγω (ágō, to lead) and the Sanskrit अजति (ájati, to drive, propel, cast).

Verb[edit]

at aka (third person singular past indicative ók, third person plural past indicative óku, supine ikið)

  1. to drive

Conjugation[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse aka (to move, to drive) from Proto-Germanic *akaną, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eǵ-. Cognates include Latin agō, Ancient Greek ἄγω (ágō, to lead) and Sanskrit अजति (ájati, to drive, propel, cast).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

aka (strong verb, third-person singular past indicative ók, third-person plural past indicative óku, supine ekið)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, governs dative) to drive (a vehicle)
    Aki maður gegn rauðu ljósi má hann eiga von á sekt.
    If a man drives against (i.e. past) a red light, he may expect a fine.
    aka bifreið er harla ólíkt því að aka hestvagni.
    Driving a motorcar is very different from driving a horse-drawn carriage.
  2. to move slightly, to budge

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

aka

  1. rōmaji reading of あか

Kashubian[edit]

Noun[edit]

aka

  1. hoe

Latvian[edit]

Wikipedia-logo.png
 Aka on Latvian Wikipedia

Wikipedia lv

Aka

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Baltic *ak- (with an extra ), from Proto-Indo-European *okʷ-, from *h₃okʷ-, *h₃ekʷ- “eye”, whence also Latvian acs “eye”, (q.v.); in fact, aka is, historically speaking, a variant of acs. The semantic relation goes clearly via the similarity of a hole (from which one obtains water) to an eye. Initially probably used for “ice-hole” (like its Lithuanian cognate), and later “well.” Cognates (in addition to those listed under acs include Lithuanian akà, ãkas (ice-hole), Old Church Slavonic око (oko, eye) (gen. очесе (očese)), Russian poetic око (óko), Bulgarian око (okó), Czech, Polish oko, Ancient Greek ὀπή (opḗ, hole, opening, cave; visiion).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

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Noun[edit]

aka f (4th declension)

  1. well (a hole in the ground, from which water can be obtained)
    artēziskā aka — artesian well
    drenāžas aka — drain well
    akas ūdenswell water
    akas vindawell winch
    akas grodiwell curb
    rakt aku — to dig a well
    iet uz aku pēc ūdens — to go to a well for (= to get) water
    tumšs kā akā — as dark as in a well (= very dark)
    Līču pagalmā ir... dziļa un stipriem grodiem izbūvēta aka — in the backyard of the Līcis (family)... there is a deep well, built with a strong curb

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “aka” in Konstantīns Karulis (1992, 2001), Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca, in 2 vols, Rīga: AVOTS, ISBN: 9984-700-12-7

Lavukaleve[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

aka

  1. then

Maori[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Eastern Polynesian *aka, from Proto-Nuclear Polynesian *aka, from Proto-Polynesian *aka, from Proto-Oceanic *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ.

Noun[edit]

aka

  1. root (of plant)

Old Norse[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: ak‧a

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *akaną, from Proto-Indo-European. Cognates include Ancient Greek ἄγω (ágō, lead), Latin agō (do, drive) and Sanskrit अजति (ajati, drive, propel, cast).

Verb[edit]

aka (singular past indicative ók, plural past indicative óku, past participle akinn)

  1. To drive (e.g. a cart).

Descendants[edit]


Rapa Nui[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Eastern Polynesian *aka, from Proto-Nuclear Polynesian *aka, from Proto-Polynesian *aka, from Proto-Oceanic *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ.

Noun[edit]

aka

  1. root (of plant)

Sranan Tongo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch haak.

Noun[edit]

aka

  1. hook

Tongan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian *aka, from Proto-Polynesian *aka, from Proto-Oceanic *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ.

Noun[edit]

aka

  1. root (of plant)

Torres Strait Creole[edit]

Noun[edit]

aka

  1. grandmother

Turkish[edit]

Noun[edit]

aka

  1. dative singular of ak

Uzbek[edit]

Other scripts
Cyrillic ака
Roman aka
Perso-Arabic ‍‍

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Turkic *(i)āka

Noun[edit]

aka (plural akalar)

  1. brother