aka

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See also: Aka, AKA, A.K.A., åka, akā, āķa, a/k/a, and a.k.a.

English[edit]

Preposition[edit]

aka

  1. alternative case form of AKA

Anagrams[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse aka (to move, to drive), from Proto-Germanic *akaną, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eǵ-. Cognates include Latin agō (I drive), Ancient Greek ἄγω (ágō, to lead) and Sanskrit अजति (ájati, to drive, propel, cast).

Verb[edit]

at aka (third person singular past indicative ók, third person plural past indicative óku, supine ikið)

  1. to drive

Conjugation[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse aka (to move, to drive) from Proto-Germanic *akaną, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eǵ-. Cognates include Latin agō, Ancient Greek ἄγω (ágō, to lead) and Sanskrit अजति (ájati, to drive, propel, cast).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

aka (strong verb, third-person singular past indicative ók, third-person plural past indicative óku, supine ekið)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, governs dative) to drive (a vehicle)
    Aki maður gegn rauðu ljósi má hann eiga von á sekt.
    If a man drives against (i.e. past) a red light, he may expect a fine.
    aka bifreið er harla ólíkt því að aka hestvagni.
    Driving a motorcar is very different from driving a horse-drawn carriage.
  2. to move slightly, to budge

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

aka

  1. rōmaji reading of あか

Kashubian[edit]

Noun[edit]

aka

  1. hoe

Latvian[edit]

Wikipedia-logo.png
 Aka on Latvian Wikipedia

Wikipedia lv

Aka

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Baltic *ak- (with an extra ), from Proto-Indo-European *okʷ-, from *h₃okʷ-, *h₃ekʷ- “eye”, whence also Latvian acs “eye”, (q.v.); in fact, aka is, historically speaking, a variant of acs. The semantic relation goes clearly via the similarity of a hole (from which one obtains water) to an eye. Initially probably used for “ice-hole” (like its Lithuanian cognate), and later “well.” Cognates (in addition to those listed under acs include Lithuanian akà, ãkas (ice-hole), Old Church Slavonic око (oko, eye) (gen. очесе (očese)), Russian poetic око (óko), Bulgarian око (okó), Czech, Polish oko, Ancient Greek ὀπή (opḗ, hole, opening, cave; visiion).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

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Noun[edit]

aka f (4th declension)

  1. well (a hole in the ground, from which water can be obtained)
    artēziskā aka — artesian well
    drenāžas aka — drain well
    akas ūdenswell water
    akas vindawell winch
    akas grodiwell curb
    rakt aku — to dig a well
    iet uz aku pēc ūdens — to go to a well for (= to get) water
    tumšs kā akā — as dark as in a well (= very dark)
    Līču pagalmā ir... dziļa un stipriem grodiem izbūvēta aka — in the backyard of the Līcis (family)... there is a deep well, built with a strong curb

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “aka” in Konstantīns Karulis (1992, 2001), Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca, in 2 vols, Rīga: AVOTS, ISBN: 9984-700-12-7

Lavukaleve[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

aka

  1. then

Maori[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Eastern Polynesian *aka, from Proto-Nuclear Polynesian *aka, from Proto-Polynesian *aka, from Proto-Oceanic *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ.

Noun[edit]

aka

  1. root (of plant)

Maquiritari[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Preposition[edit]

aka

  1. (Ye'kwana dialect) within, inside

References[edit]

  • Cáceres, Natalia. Grammaire Fonctionelle-Typologique du Ye'kwana.

Old Norse[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: ak‧a

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *akaną, from Proto-Indo-European. Cognates include Ancient Greek ἄγω (ágō, lead), Latin agō (do, drive) and Sanskrit अजति (ajati, drive, propel, cast).

Verb[edit]

aka (singular past indicative ók, plural past indicative óku, past participle akinn)

  1. To drive (e.g. a cart).

Descendants[edit]


Rapa Nui[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Eastern Polynesian *aka, from Proto-Nuclear Polynesian *aka, from Proto-Polynesian *aka, from Proto-Oceanic *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ.

Noun[edit]

aka

  1. root (of plant)

Sranan Tongo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch haak.

Noun[edit]

aka

  1. hook

Tongan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian *aka, from Proto-Polynesian *aka, from Proto-Oceanic *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ.

Noun[edit]

aka

  1. root (of plant)

Torres Strait Creole[edit]

Noun[edit]

aka

  1. grandmother

Turkish[edit]

Noun[edit]

aka

  1. dative singular of ak

Uzbek[edit]

Other scripts
Cyrillic ака
Roman aka
Perso-Arabic ‍‍

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Turkic *(i)āka

Noun[edit]

aka (plural akalar)

  1. brother

Wauja[edit]

Interjection[edit]

aka

  1. ow, ouch (expressing pain, esp. sharp pain, or pain at being struck)
    Aka! Tyenho hokota natu.
    Ouch! The knife cut me.
    Aka! Kaupai nutanaka!
    Ow! My back hurts!
    Aka! Ata onuka natu!
    Ouch! That branch hit me.
    Mainyataitsawi. Aka! Aka! Aka! umawi.
    They struck [him] repeatedly. Ow! Ow! Ow! [he] said.
  2. oh, oops (expressing startlement, embarrassment, surprise, or shock)
    Aka! Takata nuutsa.
    Oops! I dropped it. (lit., [it] simply fell from me.)
  3. oh, aah (expressing alarm, fright, shock or grief)
    Aka! Pityahoma! Talukene minya aitsu!
    Aah! Run fast, [or] they'll bite us!
    [Said when village dogs were chasing us.]
    Aka! Aminya!
    Oh! Don't [do that]! (Watch out!)

References[edit]

  • E. Ireland field notes. Need to be checked by native speaker.

wau:aka