barn

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia

A barn (farm building) in Lithuania

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Middle English bern, from Old English bereærn (barn, granary), compound of bere (barley) and ærn, ræn (dwelling, barn), from Proto-Germanic *razną (compare Old High German erin, Old Norse rann), from pre-Germanic *h₁rh̥₁-s-nó-, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁erh₁- 'to rest'. More at rest and barley.

Noun[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

barn (plural barns)

  1. (agriculture) A building, often found on a farm, used for storage or keeping animals such as cattle.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 11, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      One day I was out in the barn and he drifted in. I was currying the horse and he set down on the wheelbarrow and begun to ask questions.
  2. (nuclear physics) A unit of surface area equal to 10-28 square metres.
  3. (informal, Canada, ice hockey) An arena.
    Maple Leaf Gardens was a grand old barn.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

barn (third-person singular simple present barns, present participle barning, simple past and past participle barned)

  1. (transitive) To lay up in a barn.
    • Shakespeare
      Men [] often barn up the chaff, and burn up the grain.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fuller to this entry?)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English barn, bern, from Old English bearn (child, son, offspring, prodigy) and Old Norse barn (child). More at bairn.

Noun[edit]

barn (plural barns)

  1. (dialect, parts of Northern England) A child.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Breton[edit]

Verb[edit]

barn

  1. to judge

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse barn (child).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /barn/, [b̥ɑːˀn]

Noun[edit]

barn n (singular definite barnet, plural indefinite børn)

  1. A child.

Usage notes[edit]

In compounds: barn-, barne-, barns-, børne- or -barn (-barnet, -børn, -børnene).

Related terms[edit]

Inflection[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse barn, from Proto-Germanic *barną, the passive participle of *beraną; cognate with Latvian bērns (child), Lithuanian bérnas (servant); from from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer-, *bʰére-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

barn n (genitive singular barns, plural børn)

  1. child

Declension[edit]

n5 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative barn barnið børn børnini
Accusative barn barnið børn børnini
Dative barni barninum børnum børnunum
Genitive barns barnsins barna barnanna

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

barn

  1. Romanization of 𐌱𐌰𐍂𐌽

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse barn, from Proto-Germanic *barną.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

barn n (genitive singular barns, nominative plural börn)

  1. a child

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse barn.

Noun[edit]

barn n (definite singular barnet, indefinite plural barn, definite plural barna or barnene)

  1. a child

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse barn.

Noun[edit]

barn n (definite singular barnet; indefinite plural barn/born; definite plural barna/borna)

  1. a child

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *barną, the passive participle of *beraną; cognate with Latvian bērns (child), Lithuanian bérnas (servant); from from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer-, *bʰére-.

Noun[edit]

barn n (genitive barn, plural bǫrn)

  1. child

Declension[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *barną, whence also Old English barn, Old High German barn, Swedish barn.

Noun[edit]

barn n

  1. child

Declension[edit]


Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse barn.

Noun[edit]

barn n

  1. child

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Polish[edit]

Noun[edit]

barn m

  1. barn (unit)

Declension[edit]

External links[edit]

  • barn” in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish barn (child), from Old Norse barn (child), from Proto-Germanic *barną. Cognate with Danish, Icelandic, Old Saxon, Old High German barn. Cognate with Latvian bĕrns (child), Lithuanian bérnas (worker) and bernélis (child), a kind of participle to bära (to bear, to carry, as in childbirth).

Noun[edit]

barn n

  1. a child (a young person)
  2. (someone's) child, offspring (a son or daughter)
  3. a descendant (e.g. children of Abraham)
  4. a follower (e.g. God's children)
  5. (someone's) creation, invention
  6. (uncountable) barn; a unit of area in nuclear physics

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

barn f (plural barnau)

  1. opinion, view

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
barn farn marn unchanged