pay

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English payen, from Old French paier, from Medieval Latin pācāre (to settle, satisfy) from Latin pacare (to pacify). Displaced native Middle English yelden, yielden (to pay) (from Old English ġieldan (to pay)), Middle English schotten (to pay, make payment) (from Old English scot, ġescot (payment)).

Verb[edit]

pay (third-person singular simple present pays, present participle paying, simple past and past participle paid or (archaic) payed)

  1. (transitive) To give money or other compensation to in exchange for goods or services.
    he paid him to clean the place up;  he paid her off the books and in kind where possible
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 17, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      This time was most dreadful for Lilian. Thrown on her own resources and almost penniless, she maintained herself and paid the rent of a wretched room near the hospital by working as a charwoman, sempstress, anything.
    • 2013 June 21, Oliver Burkeman, “The tao of tech”, The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 2, page 48: 
      The dirty secret of the internet is that all this distraction and interruption is immensely profitable. Web companies like to boast about [] and so on. But the real way to build a successful online business is to be better than your rivals at undermining people's control of their own attention. Partly, this is a result of how online advertising has traditionally worked: advertisers pay for clicks, and a click is a click, however it's obtained.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To discharge, as a debt or other obligation, by giving or doing what is due or required.
    she offered to pay the bill;  he has paid his debt to society
    • Bible, Psalms xxxvii. 21
      The wicked borroweth, and payeth not again.
    • 2013 June 22, “T time”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8841, page 68: 
      Yet in “Through a Latte, Darkly”, a new study of how Starbucks has largely avoided paying tax in Britain, Edward Kleinbard […] shows that current tax rules make it easy for all sorts of firms to generate what he calls “stateless income”: […]. In Starbucks’s case, the firm has in effect turned the process of making an expensive cup of coffee into intellectual property.
  3. (transitive) To be profitable for.
    It didn't pay him to keep the store open any more.
  4. (transitive) To give (something else than money).
    to pay attention
    • William Shakespeare (c.1564–1616)
      not paying me a welcome
    • 1909, Archibald Marshall, The Squire's Daughter, ch.I:
      They stayed together during three dances, went out on to the terrace, explored wherever they were permitted to explore, paid two visits to the buffet, and enjoyed themselves much in the same way as if they had been school-children surreptitiously breaking loose from an assembly of grown-ups.
  5. (intransitive) To be profitable or worth the effort.
    crime doesn’t pay;   it will pay to wait
  6. (intransitive) To discharge an obligation or debt.
    He was allowed to go as soon as he paid.
  7. (intransitive) To suffer consequences.
    He paid for his fun in the sun with a terrible sunburn.
Derived terms[edit]
Hypernyms[edit]
Hyponyms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun[edit]

pay (plural pays)

  1. Money given in return for work; salary or wages.
    Many employers have rules designed to keep employees from comparing their pays.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 10, The Celebrity:
      The skipper Mr. Cooke had hired at Far Harbor was a God-fearing man with a luke warm interest in his new billet and employer, and had only been prevailed upon to take charge of the yacht after the offer of an emolument equal to half a year's sea pay of an ensign in the navy.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

pay (not comparable)

  1. Operable or accessible on deposit of coins.
    pay toilet
  2. Pertaining to or requiring payment.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Old French peier, from Latin picare (to pitch).

Verb[edit]

pay (third-person singular simple present pays, present participle paying, simple past and past participle payed)

  1. (nautical, transitive) To cover (the bottom of a vessel, a seam, a spar, etc.) with tar or pitch, or a waterproof composition of tallow, resin, etc.; to smear.

Statistics[edit]

External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Azeri[edit]

Other scripts
Cyrillic пај
Roman pay
Perso-Arabic پای

Noun[edit]

pay (definite accusative payı, plural paylar)

  1. share
  2. portion

Declension[edit]


Kurdish[edit]

Noun[edit]

pay ?

  1. share

Old Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From padre, from Latin patrem, accusative singular of pater (father), from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pay m

  1. (hypocoristic, usually childish) papa, dad, father

Synonyms[edit]

Coordinate terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Galician: pai
  • Portuguese: pai
    • Indo-Portuguese: pai

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

pay m (plural pays)

  1. obsolete spelling of pai

Quechua[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

pay

  1. he, she, it

See also[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Turkic.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [paj]
  • Hyphenation: pay

Noun[edit]

pay (definite accusative payı, plural paylar)

  1. portion
  2. (arithmetic) numerator

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Declension[edit]