ok

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See also: OK and ők

English[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ok

  1. (informal) Alternative capitalization of OK.

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ok

  1. genitive plural of oko

Esperanto[edit]

Esperanto cardinal numbers
7 8 9
    Cardinal : ok
    Ordinal : oka
    Adverbial : oke
    Multiplier : okobla

Etymology[edit]

From Latin octo

Pronunciation[edit]

Cardinal numeral[edit]

ok

  1. (cardinal) eight (8)

Derived terms[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse ok, from Proto-Germanic *juką, from Proto-Indo-European *yugóm.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ok n (genitive singular oks, plural ok)

  1. yoke

Declension[edit]

n3 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ok okið ok okini
Accusative ok okið ok okini
Dative oki okinum okum okunum
Genitive oks oksins oka okanna

Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ok (plural okok)

  1. cause
  2. reason

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Compound words

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse ok, from Proto-Germanic *juką, from Proto-Indo-European *yugóm.

Noun[edit]

ok n (genitive singular oks, nominative plural ok)

  1. yoke

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Ido[edit]

Numeral[edit]

ok

  1. (cardinal) eight (8)

Old Norse[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *auk (also). Cognate with Old English ēac, Old Frisian āk, Old Saxon ōk, Old High German ouh, Gothic 𐌰𐌿𐌺 (auk).

Conjunction[edit]

ok

  1. and
Descendants[edit]
  • Danish: og
  • Faroese: og
  • Icelandic: og
  • Norwegian: og
  • Swedish: och

Adverb[edit]

ok

  1. also, too

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *juką, from Proto-Indo-European *yugóm.

Noun[edit]

ok n (genitive oks, plural ok)

  1. yoke
Declension[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Danish: åg
  • Faroese: ok
  • Icelandic: ok
  • Norwegian: åk
  • Swedish: ok

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *auk.

Adverb[edit]

ōk

  1. also, too

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse ok, from Proto-Germanic *juką, from Proto-Indo-European *yugóm.

Noun[edit]

ok n

  1. yoke; a wooden bar used to connect two oxen by their shoulders
  2. yoke; a wooden bar to be placed over one's shoulders, and used to carry buckets
  3. heavy burden
  4. yoke; the part of a shirt draped over the wearer's shoulders

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic ok (arrow), from Proto-Turkic.

Noun[edit]

ok (definite accusative oğu, plural oklar)

  1. arrow

Derived terms[edit]


Vilamovian[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ok

  1. only, to

Volapük[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ok

  1. oneself

Declension[edit]


Yessan-Mayo[edit]

Noun[edit]

ok m

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Australian Languages: Classification and the comparative method (2004, ISBN 9027295115)

ar:ok az:ok bs:ok br:ok cs:ok de:ok el:ok es:ok eo:ok eu:ok fo:ok fr:ok fy:ok ko:ok hy:ok io:ok is:ok it:ok ka:ok csb:ok ku:ok lt:ok li:ok hu:ok mg:ok my:ok nah:ok nl:ok ja:ok no:ok oc:ok uz:ok pl:ok pt:ok ru:ok simple:ok fi:ok sv:ok tl:ok ta:ok chr:ok tr:ok uk:ok vi:ok vo:ok zh:ok