pose

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See also: posé and Pose

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English pose, from Old English ġeposu (cold in the head; catarrh).

Noun[edit]

pose (plural poses)

  1. (obsolete) common cold, head cold; catarrh

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English posen, from Old French poser (to put, place, stell, settle, lodge), from Vulgar Latin pausare (to blin, cease, pause), from Latin pausa (pause), from Ancient Greek παῦσις (paûsis); influenced by Latin ponere.

Verb[edit]

pose (third-person singular simple present poses, present participle posing, simple past and past participle posed)

  1. (transitive) To place in an attitude or fixed position, for the sake of effect.
    To pose a model for a picture.
  2. (transitive) Ask; set (a test, quiz, riddle, etc.).
  3. (transitive) To constitute (a danger, a threat, a risk, etc.).
    • 2010, Noam Chomsky, The Iranian threat, Z Magazine, vol 23, number 7:
      Rather, they are concerned with the threat Iran poses to the region and the world.
    • 2011 September 2, Phil McNulty, “Bulgaria 0-3 England”, BBC:
      Rooney's United team-mate Chris Smalling was given his debut at right-back and was able to adjust to the international stage in relatively relaxed fashion as Bulgaria barely posed a threat of any consequence.
    • 2014, Ian Black, "Courts kept busy as Jordan works to crush support for Isis", The Guardian, 27 November 2014:
      The threat the most radical of them pose is evidently far greater at home than abroad: in one characteristically slick and chilling Isis video – entitled “a message to the Jordanian tyrant” – a smiling, long-haired young man in black pats the explosive belt round his waist as he burns his passport and his fellow fighters praise the memory of Zarqawi, who was killed in Iraq in 2006.
  4. (intransitive) Assume or maintain a pose; strike an attitude.
    • Thackeray
      He [] posed before her as a hero.
  5. (obsolete, transitive) To interrogate; to question.
    • Francis Bacon
      She [] posed him and sifted him.
  6. (obsolete, transitive) To question with a view to puzzling; to embarrass by questioning or scrutiny; to bring to a stand.
    • Barrow
      A question wherewith a learned Pharisee thought to pose and puzzle him.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

pose (plural poses)

  1. Position, posture, arrangement (especially of the human body).
    Please adopt a more graceful pose for my camera.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 5, The Celebrity:
      Then came a maid with hand-bag and shawls, and after her a tall young lady. She stood for a moment holding her skirt above the grimy steps, with something of the stately pose which Richter has given his Queen Louise on the stairway, [] .
  2. Affectation.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English posen, a combination of aphetic forms of Middle English aposen and opposen. More at appose, oppose.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

pose (third-person singular simple present poses, present participle posing, simple past and past participle posed)

  1. (obsolete) To ask (someone) questions; to interrogate.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Luke II:
      And hit fortuned that after .iii. dayes, they founde hym in the temple sittinge in the middes of the doctours, both hearynge them, and posinge them.
  2. (now rare) to puzzle, non-plus, or embarrass with difficult questions.
  3. (now rare) To perplex or confuse (someone).
Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from French

Pronunciation[edit]

Hyphenation: po‧se

Noun[edit]

pose f (plural posen or poses, diminutive posetje n)

  1. stance or pose

Anagrams[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

pose

  1. (slang) jail

Declension[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Derived from the verb poser. Compare also Italian posa, Latin pausa.

Noun[edit]

pose f (plural poses)

  1. installation

Noun[edit]

pose m (plural poses)

  1. extension (in telecommunications)

Verb[edit]

pose

  1. first-person singular present indicative of poser
  2. third-person singular present indicative of poser
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of poser
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of poser
  5. second-person singular imperative of poser

External links[edit]


Ido[edit]

Adverb[edit]

pose

  1. afterwards

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

póse, /ˈpose/, /"pose/

Verb[edit]

pose

  1. third-person singular past historic of porre

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse posi

Noun[edit]

pose m (definite singular posen, indefinite plural poser, definite plural posene)

  1. bag, sack

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse posi

Noun[edit]

pose m (definite singular posen, indefinite plural posar, definite plural posane)

  1. a bag or sack

Derived terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

pose

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of posar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of posar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of posar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of posar.