ac

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

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From Middle English, ac, oc, from Old English ac, oc (but, for, because, conjunction), from Proto-Germanic *ak (but, moveover).

Alternative forms[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ac

  1. (obsolete, dialectal, Scotland) But.
    • 1535, Stewart, Chronicles of Scotland:
      [...] Amang the aill gart tume thame in the fatt; Ac leit it stand at greit laser and lenth, [...]

Etymology 2[edit]

Initialism[edit]

ac

  1. account; money of account
  2. acre
  3. air conditioning
  4. alicyclic
  5. (electricity) alternating current
  6. (medicine) ante cibum, before meals

Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin acus. Compare Daco-Romanian ac.

Noun[edit]

ac

  1. needle

Classical Nahuatl[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

āc (plural āc ihqueh, āquihqueh)

  1. Who.

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • 1983, Karttunen, Frances, An Analytical Dictionary of Nahuatl, Austin: University of Texas Press, page p. 1:
  • 2001, Lockhart, James, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts, Stanford: Stanford University Press, page p. 210:

Ladin[edit]

Noun[edit]

ac

  1. plural form of at

Latin[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ac

  1. and, and also, and even, and too
    • Eminentissimum ac reverendissimum dominum.
      The Most Eminent and Reverend Lord.
  2. and besides
  3. than
    • Ea res longe aliter, ac ratus erat, evenit.
      It happened far differently than he had thought.

Usage notes[edit]

  • ac is usually found in front of words beginning with consonants, rarely before vowels (compare: atque).

Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English ac.

Conjunction[edit]

ac

  1. but

Middle Welsh[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ac

  1. and

Preposition[edit]

ac

  1. with

Old English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *aiks, from Proto-Indo-European *eiǵ-. Cognate with Old Frisian ēk, Old Saxon ēk, Dutch eik, Old High German eih (German Eiche), Old Norse eik (Swedish ek, Danish eg).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

āc f

  1. oak (wood or tree)
  2. (poetic) an oaken ship
  3. The runic character (/a/)
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *ak. Cognate with Old Saxon ac, Gothic 𐌰𐌺 (ak), Old High German oh.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ac

  1. but

Old Saxon[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ac

  1. Alternative form of ak

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin acus.

Noun[edit]

ac n (plural ace)

  1. needle

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]