gone

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See also: góneʼ

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • ywent (obsolete verb form)

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English gon, igon, gan, ȝegan, from Old English gān, ġegān, from Proto-Germanic *gānaz (gone), past participle of Proto-Germanic *gāną (to go). Cognate with Scots gane (gone), West Frisian gien (gone), Dutch gegaan (gone).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

gone

  1. past participle of go

Derived terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gone (not comparable)

  1. Away, having left.
    Are they gone already?
  2. (figuratively) No longer part of the present situation.
    Don't both trying to understand what Grandma says, she's gone.
    He won't be going out with us tonight. Now that he's engaged, he's gone.
    Have you seen their revenue numbers? They're gone.
  3. No longer existing, having passed.
    The days of my youth are gone.
  4. Used up.
    I'm afraid all the coffee's gone at the moment.
  5. Dead.
  6. (colloquial) Intoxicated to the point of being unaware of one's surroundings
    Dude, look at Jack. He's completely gone.
  7. (colloquial) Excellent; wonderful.
  8. (archaic) Ago (used post-positionally).
    • 1999, George RR Martin, A Clash of Kings, Bantam 2011, p. 491:
      Six nights gone, your brother fell upon my uncle Stafford, encamped with his host at a village called Oxcross not three days ride from Casterly Rock.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Preposition[edit]

gone

  1. (UK, informal) Past, after, later than (a time).
    You'd better hurry up, it's gone four o'clock.

Statistics[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Fijian[edit]

Noun[edit]

gone

  1. child

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Apparently from Franco-Provençal.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gone m (plural gones)

  1. (Lyon dialect) kid (child)

External links[edit]