ay

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See also: Ay, ẩy, ấy, and

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

ay

  1. Ah! alas!
  2. Alternative spelling of aye ("yes")
    • 1883, Howard Pyle, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood Chapter V
      "Good morrow to thee, jolly fellow," quoth Robin, "thou seemest happy this merry morn."
      "Ay, that am I," quoth the jolly Butcher, "and why should I not be so? Am I not hale in wind and limb? Have I not the bonniest lass in all Nottinghamshire? And lastly, am I not to be married to her on Thursday next in sweet Locksley Town?"
  3. New Zealand spelling of eh (question tag)

Adverb[edit]

ay (not comparable)

  1. Always; ever.
    • 1670, John Barbour, The Acts and Life of the most victorious Conquerour Robert Bruce King of Scotland, as cited in 1860, Thomas Corser, Collectanea Anglo-poetica, page 160
      O he that hath ay lived free, [...]

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ay (not comparable)

  1. For an indefinite time.

Synonyms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ay (plural ays)

  1. Alternative spelling of aye ("yes")
    counting the ays and the noes in a vote

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Azeri[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic ay, from Proto-Turkic.

Noun[edit]

Other scripts
Cyrillic ај
Roman ay
Perso-Arabic آی

ay (definite accusative ayı, plural aylar)

  1. moon
  2. month

Declension[edit]


Crimean Tatar[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic ay, from Proto-Turkic.

Noun[edit]

ay

  1. month
  2. moon

Declension[edit]

References[edit]


Gagauz[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Turkic ay, from Proto-Turkic.

Noun[edit]

ay (definite accusative ayı, plural aylar)

  1. moon
  2. month

Etymology 2[edit]

From Ancient Greek ἅγιος (hagios).

Noun[edit]

ay (definite accusative ayı, plural aylar)

  1. saint

Ladino[edit]

Verb[edit]

ay (Latin spelling)

  1. there is, there are

Middle French[edit]

Verb[edit]

ay

  1. first-person singular present indicative of avoir

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably from a use of aye to express agreement.

Adverb[edit]

ay (not comparable)

  1. yes

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

¡ay!

  1. Expresses pain or sorrow.
  2. A stereotypical sound of a Latino or Latina (e.g. ¡Ay Papi!, something like saying "Oh Baby!")

Sranan Tongo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English eye.

Noun[edit]

ay

  1. eye

Tagalog[edit]

Preposition[edit]

ay

  1. Equality marker. It can be translated as is, am, are, was, will be, etc., but functions as a preposition, not a verb.
  2. Verb/predicate marker. Only used when the verb or predicate does not begin the sentence.

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic ay, from Proto-Turkic.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ay (objective definite ayı)

  1. month
  2. An interjection expressing a sharp pain: ouch!

Usage notes[edit]

  • Ay means moon, not ay (the first "A" is capitalized)