art

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

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Middle English art, from Old French art, from Latin artem, accusative of ars "art". Displaced native Middle English liste (art) (from Old English list).

Noun[edit]

A painting showing many kinds of art, including literature, music, and painting itself.

art (countable and uncountable, plural arts)

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  1. (uncountable) The conscious production or arrangement of sounds, colours, forms, movements, or other elements in a manner that affects the sense of beauty, specifically the production of the beautiful in a graphic or plastic medium.
    There is a debate as to whether graffiti is art or vandalism.
  2. (uncountable) Activity intended to make something special.
  3. (uncountable) A re-creation of reality according to the artist's metaphysical value judgments.
  4. (uncountable) The study and the product of these processes.
  5. (uncountable) Aesthetic value.
  6. (uncountable, printing) Artwork.
  7. (countable) A field or category of art, such as painting, sculpture, music, ballet, or literature.
  8. (countable) A nonscientific branch of learning; one of the liberal arts.
    • 2013 August 3, “Boundary problems”, The Economist, volume 408, number 8847: 
      Economics is a messy discipline: too fluid to be a science, too rigorous to be an art. Perhaps it is fitting that economists’ most-used metric, gross domestic product (GDP), is a tangle too. GDP measures the total value of output in an economic territory. Its apparent simplicity explains why it is scrutinised down to tenths of a percentage point every month.
  9. (countable) Skill that is attained by study, practice, or observation.
    • 1796, Matthew Lewis, The Monk, Folio Society 1985, page 217:
      A physician was immediately sent for; but on the first moment of beholding the corpse, he declared that Elvira's recovery was beyond the power of art.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 4, The Celebrity:
      The Celebrity, by arts unknown, induced Mrs. Judge Short and two other ladies to call at Mohair on an afternoon when Mr. Cooke was trying a trotter on the track. The three returned wondering and charmed with Mrs. Cooke; they were sure she had had no hand in the furnishing of that atrocious house.
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Quotations[edit]
  • 2005, "I tell her what Donald Hall says: that the problem with workshops is that they trivialize art by minimizing the terror." -July Harper's, Lynn Freed
  • 2009, "Visual art is a subjective understanding or perception of the viewer as well as a deliberate/conscious arrangement or creation of elements like colours, forms, movements, sounds, objects or other elements that produce a graphic or plastic whole that expresses thoughts, ideas or visions of the artist." - Extended Essay on Visual Art, Alexander Brouwer
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English, from Old English eart ((thou) art), second-person singular present indicative of wesan, from Proto-Germanic *ar-t ((thou) art", originally, "(thou) becamest), second-person singular preterite indicative form of *iraną (to rise, be quick, become active), from Proto-Indo-European *er-, *or(w)- (to lift, rise, set in motion). Cognate with Faroese ert (art), Icelandic ert (art), Old English earon (are), from the same preterite-present Germanic verb. More at are.

Verb[edit]

art

  1. (archaic) second-person singular simple present form of be
    How great thou art!

See also[edit]

Statistics[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin ars, artem.

Noun[edit]

art m (definite singular arti)

  1. art

Catalan[edit]

Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia ca

Noun[edit]

art m, f (plural arts)

  1. art (something pleasing to the mind)

Related terms[edit]


Cornish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ars, artis (art).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

art m (plural artys)

  1. art

Crimean Tatar[edit]

Noun[edit]

art

  1. back

Synonyms[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German art.

Noun[edit]

art c (singular definite arten, plural indefinite arter)

  1. kind
  2. nature
  3. species

Inflection[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin artem, accusative singular of ars.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

art m (plural arts)

  1. art (something pleasing to the mind)

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Latvian[edit]

Art
Art ar traktoru

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Baltic, from Proto-Indo-European *ar-, *arə-, *h₂erh₃- (to plow), from *h₁er- (sparse; to crumble, to fall to pieces), whence also the verb irt (q.v.). Cognates include Lithuanian árti, Old Prussian artoys (plowman) (compare Lithuanian artójas), Old Church Slavonic орати (orati), Russian dialectal or dated ора́ть (orátʹ), Belarusian ара́ць (arácʹ), Ukrainian ора́ти (oráty), Bulgarian ора́ (orá), Czech orati, Polish orać, Gothic 𐌰𐍂𐌾𐌰𐌽 (arjan), Old Norse erja, Hittite ẖarra- (to crush; (passive form) to disappear), ẖarš- (to tear open; to plow), Ancient Greek ἀρόω (aróō), Latin arō.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

(file)

Verb[edit]

art tr., 1st conj., pres. aru, ar, ar, past aru

  1. to plow (to prepare (land) for sowing by using a plow)
    art zemi — to plow the land, earth
    art tīrumu, lauku — to plow a field
    art dārzu — to plow a garden
    art kūdraino augsni — to plow the peaty soil
    art ar traktoru — to plow with a tractor
    papuvi ara divi traktori — two tractors plowed the fallow (land)
    iziet art agri no rīta — to go plowing early in the morning
    rudenī, rugāju arot, sekoju Jurim pa vagu un sarunājos — in autumn, while (he was) plowing the stubble field, I followed Juris along the furrows and talked

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “art” in Konstantīns Karulis (1992, 2001), Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca, in 2 vols, Rīga: AVOTS, ISBN: 9984-700-12-7.

Maltese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic ارض (’arɖ).

Noun[edit]

art f

  1. earth

Middle French[edit]

Noun[edit]

art m (plural ars)

  1. art

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

Noun[edit]

art m, f (definite singular arta or arten, indefinite plural arter, definite plural artene)

  1. (biology) a species

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nn

Noun[edit]

art m, f (definite singular arten or arta, indefinite plural artar or arter, definite plural artane or artene)

  1. (biology) a species

Derived terms[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *artos (bear) (compare Cornish arth, Welsh arth), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ŕ̥tḱos (bear).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

art m

  1. bear

Synonyms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
art unchanged n-art
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

art c

  1. species

Declension[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic art, from Proto-Turkic *hārt (back).

Noun[edit]

art

  1. back