hart

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See also: Hart and hårt

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English hert, from Old English heorot (stag), from Proto-Germanic *herutaz (compare Dutch hert, German Hirsch, Danish/Swedish hjort), from Pre-Germanic *k̑erudo, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóru (horn).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hart (plural harts)

  1. A male deer, especially the male of the red deer after its fifth year.
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See heart

Noun[edit]

hart (plural harts)

  1. obsolete spelling of heart

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch hart.

Noun[edit]

hart (plural harte)

  1. heart

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch herte, harte, from Old Dutch herta, from Proto-Germanic *hertô, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱḗr. Cognate with West Frisian hert, English heart, German Herz, {{etyl|sv|-} hjärta. The Indo-European root is also the source of Greek καρδία (kardía), Latin cor, Welsh craidd, Irish croí, Russian се́рдце (sérdce), Lithuanian širdis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hart n (plural harten, diminutive hartje n)

  1. (anatomy) The heart, main muscle pumping blood through the body:
  2. The center point or zone of an object, image etc.
  3. The core or essence of some thing, reasoning etc.
  4. Compassionate or similar feelings

Derived terms[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Adjective[edit]

hart (neuter of harður)

  1. hard
  2. loud

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Frankish *hard (compare Middle Dutch herde, German Hardt).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hart f (plural harts)

  1. (archaic) cord, rope; halter (hangman's rope)

External links[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German hart, from Proto-Germanic *harduz, from Proto-Indo-European *kert-, *kret- (strong; powerful). Cognate with Low German hard, hart, Dutch hard, English hard, Danish hård.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (standard German) IPA(key): /haʁt/
  • (common, especially in northern and central Germany) IPA(key): /haːt/
  • (file)
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

hart (comparative härter, superlative am härtesten)

  1. hard
  2. severe, harsh
    • 2012 May 2, Die Welt [1], page 10:
      Die harten Einschnitte zum Schuldenabbau standen in vielen EU-Ländern im Zentrum der Kritik der Demonstranten.
      The severe cuts for the reduction of debt were in many EU countries at the center of criticism by the protesters.

Declension[edit]

External links[edit]

  • hart in Duden online

Icelandic[edit]

Adjective[edit]

hart

  1. neuter nominative and accusative of harður

North Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian herte. Cognates include West Frisian hert.

Noun[edit]

hart n (plural harten)

  1. (Föhr-Amrum, anatomy) heart
    At hart klopet/böget
    My heart is beating.

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *harduz, whence also Old Saxon hard, Old English heard, Old Frisian herd, Old High German hart, Old Norse harðr. Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *kert-, *kret- (strong; powerful).

Adjective[edit]

hart (comparative hardiro, superlative hardist)

  1. hard

Declension[edit]


Descendants[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *harduz, whence also Old Saxon hard, Old Dutch hart, Old English heard, Old Norse harðr, Gothic 𐌷𐌰𐍂𐌳𐌿𐍃 (hardus). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *kert-, *kret- (strong; powerful).

Adjective[edit]

hart

  1. hard

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]