wesan

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Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wesaną, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wes-.

Verb[edit]

wesan

  1. to be

Conjugation[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wesaną, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wes-. The simple present forms originate from Proto-Indo-European *h₁es- (to be), which had no infinitive or past tense in Proto-Germanic, but had already formed a single paradigm with *wesaną supplying the infinitive and past tense.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

wesan

  1. to be, exist
Usage notes[edit]

The verb "to be" in Old English was suppletive, and used forms from at least three different roots. There were two distinct present stems, for which wesan and bēon were the two infinitive forms. The present bēon was used to express permanent truths (the "gnomic present"), while wesan was used for the present participle and the preterite. They both shared the same past tense forms.

Conjugation[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

wēsan

  1. to soak; macerate; dye
  2. to ooze
Conjugation[edit]

This verb needs an inflection-table template.



Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wesaną, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wes-.

Verb[edit]

wesan

  1. to be, exist

Conjugation[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wesaną, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wes-.

Verb[edit]

wesan (irregular)

  1. to be
    managa sind thero thea uuilliad te drohtine hnigan — many are the those who want to bow fore the Lord (Heliand, verse 1916)
    Manega uuaron, the sia iro mod gespon — They were many, whose mind enticed them (Heliand, verse 1)
    gelîhc sulîcaro lôgnun: thit uuas alloro lando scôniust — Just like some denied: this was the most beautiful of all lands (Genesis, verse 5)

Conjugation[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

The verb "to be" in Old Saxon, as in Old English, Old Dutch and Old High German, was a compound made up of different sources. Wesan and sīn were the two infinitive forms, though wesan was the most common form. Wesan was used in the present tense to express actions while sīn was mostly used to express permanent truths. Preterit forms and participles were the same for both verbs.

Synonyms[edit]

  • sīn (Etymology 2)

Descendants[edit]


Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English white + sand.

Noun[edit]

wesan

  1. sand

Related terms[edit]