value

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the French value, feminine past participle of valoir, from Latin valere (to be strong, be worth).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

value (plural values)

  1. The quality (positive or negative) that renders something desirable or valuable.
    • 2012 May 13, Alistair Magowan, “Sunderland 0-1 Man Utd”, BBC Sport:
      United were value for their win and Rooney could have had a hat-trick before half-time, with Paul Scholes also striking the post in the second half.
    The Shakespearean Shylock is of dubious value in the modern world.
  2. The degree of importance given to something.
    • 2013 June 7, Gary Younge, “Hypocrisy lies at heart of Manning prosecution”, The Guardian Weekly, volume 188, number 26, page 18: 
      WikiLeaks did not cause these uprisings but it certainly informed them. The dispatches revealed details of corruption and kleptocracy that many Tunisians suspected, […]. They also exposed the blatant discrepancy between the west's professed values and actual foreign policies.
    The value of my children's happiness is second only to that of my wife.
  3. The amount (of money or goods or services) that is considered to be a fair equivalent for something else.
    • M'Culloch
      An article may be possessed of the highest degree of utility, or power to minister to our wants and enjoyments, and may be universally made use of, without possessing exchangeable value.
    • Dryden
      His design was not to pay him the value of his pictures, because they were above any price.
    • 2013 August 3, “Boundary problems”, The Economist, volume 408, number 8847: 
      Economics is a messy discipline: too fluid to be a science, too rigorous to be an art. Perhaps it is fitting that economists’ most-used metric, gross domestic product (GDP), is a tangle too. GDP measures the total value of output in an economic territory. Its apparent simplicity explains why it is scrutinised down to tenths of a percentage point every month.
  4. (music) The relative duration of a musical note.
    The value of a crotchet is twice that of a quaver.
  5. (art) The relative darkness or lightness of a color in (a specific area of) a painting etc.
    • Joe Hing Lowe
      I establish the colors and principal values by organizing the painting into three values--dark, medium [] and light.
  6. Numerical quantity measured or assigned or computed.
    The exact value of pi cannot be represented in decimal notation.
  7. Precise meaning; import.
    the value of a word; the value of a legal instrument
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Mitford to this entry?)
  8. (obsolete) Esteem; regard.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)
    • Bishop Burnet
      My relation to the person was so near, and my value for him so great.
  9. (obsolete) valour; also spelled valew
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)

Synonyms[edit]

  • (quality that renders something desirable): worth

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

value (third-person singular simple present values, present participle valuing, simple past and past participle valued)

  1. To estimate the value of; judge the worth of something.
    • 2013 August 3, “Boundary problems”, The Economist, volume 408, number 8847: 
      Economics is a messy discipline: too fluid to be a science, too rigorous to be an art. Perhaps it is fitting that economists’ most-used metric, gross domestic product (GDP), is a tangle too. [] But as a foundation for analysis it is highly subjective: it rests on difficult decisions about what counts as a territory, what counts as output and how to value it. Indeed, economists are still tweaking it.
    I will have the family jewels valued by a professional.
  2. To fix or determine the value of; assign a value to, as of jewelry or art work.
  3. To regard highly; think much of; place importance upon.
    Gold was valued highly among the Romans.
  4. To hold dear.
    I value these old photographs.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See also[edit]

Statistics[edit]

External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Verb[edit]

value

  1. feminine past participle of valoir