-ach

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See also: ach and ách

Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish -ach, from Proto-Celtic *-ākos; compare Welsh -og.

Pronunciation[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-ach (epicene)

  1. Forms nouns/adjectives from other nouns and adjectives with the sense of ‘person or thing connected or involved with, belonging to, having’.
    Nouns:
    Éire (Ireland) → Éireannach (Irish (person))
    Sasana (England) → Sasanach (English (person))
    Adjectives:
    bunús (basis) → bunúsach (basic)
    fearga (virile) → feargach (angry)
    Also:
    Éireannach (Irish (adj)), Sasanach (English (adj))

Usage notes[edit]

  • Nouns in -ach are first declension (for males) and second declension (for females).
  • Adjectives in -ach are first declension.

Derived terms[edit]


Middle Welsh[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-ach

  1. forms a comparative adjective

Derived terms[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • -ech (slender form)

Suffix[edit]

-ach

  1. Forming nouns from nouns and adjectives with the sense of ‘person or thing connected or involved with, belonging to, having’.

Descendants[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Rudolf Thurneysen, A Grammar of Old Irish (Dublin, 1946), §347

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-ach (plural -aich or -aichean)

  1. Forming nouns from nouns and adjectives with the sense of ‘person or thing connected or involved with, belonging to, having’.
    Eireannach, Albannach, Frangach, Lochlannach, sàmhach, beathach

Derived terms[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Welsh -ach.

Suffix[edit]

-ach

  1. Forms a comparative of an adjective of one or two syllables.

Usage notes[edit]

Triggers fortition on the final consonant of the adjective, changing b/d/g to p/t/c.

Derived terms[edit]