von

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See also: vón and vȯņ

Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably ultimately from a derivative of Latin avus, or a related term, possibly a diminutive. Compare Italian avo, avolo. Cf. also archaic Romanian bun (grandfather) (modern bunic), Calabrian and Piedmontese bona ("grandmother").

Noun[edit]

von m (plural vons)

  1. grandfather

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German von (from), from Old High German fon, fona (from), from Proto-Germanic *afanē, *fanē, *funē (from), compound of *afa ( from Proto-Indo-European *apo, *ap- (from, off)) + *ana (from Proto-Indo-European *ano (on)). Cognate with Old Saxon fana, fan (from), Old Frisian fon (from), Old English of (from). More at of, on.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

von (+ dative)

  1. from
    Ich fahre von Köln nach Hamburg.
    I'm travelling from Cologne to Hamburg.
    Ich hab’s von meiner Schwester gehört.
    I heard it from my sister.
  2. of, belonging to (often replacing genitive; see usage note below)
    das Auto von meinem Vater
    my father’s car / the car of my father
  3. by (with passive voice)
    Das Hotel wird von der Firma bezahlt.
    The hotel is paid for by the company.
  4. about, of (a topic)
    Er hat von seiner Jugend erzählt.
    He told about his youth.
    1796, Abraham Sahlstedt, Schwedische Grammatik nach dem Sprachgebrauch unserer Zeiten, Lübeck & Leipzig, p.259
    Von dem Nomine Substantivo, oder dem Hauptworte.
    About the substantive noun, or the [alternative term]. (Headline.)
  5. on, with (a resource)
    Von welchem Geld soll ich als Arbeitsloser in Urlaub fahren?
    Being unemployed, on what money should I go on holidays?
    Man kann nicht nur von Luft und Liebe leben.
    You can′t live on air and love alone. (A saying.)

Usage notes[edit]

  • (from): English “from” is generally expressed by means of von, but aus is often used with geographical names. One uses von when both the places “from which” and “to which” are given: Dieser Zug fährt von Köln nach Hamburg. – “This train goes from Cologne to Hamburg.” If the further direction is not given, aus is the normal choice: Dieser Zug kommt aus Köln. – “This train is coming from Cologne.” The phrase: Dieser Zug kommt von Köln is not wrong but has a colloquial ring to it.
  • (of): The preposition von is used to replace possessive and partitive genitives, sometimes also genitives with prepositions. Such replacement can be obligatory, optional, or restricted to the colloquial register:
It is obligatory if the genitive cannot be expressed grammatically, which is the case with common nouns not preceded by any declinable articles, determiners, or adjectives: die Rechte von Kindern (“children’s rights”); der Geschmack von Käse (“the taste of cheese”). It is also true of most singular pronouns and all personal pronouns: der Geschmack von diesem (“the taste of this”); ein Freund von mir (“a friend of mine”).
The replacement is optional in cases such as the following: 1.) with those pronouns that do have an applicable genitive form, chiefly plurals: die Arbeit vieler = die Arbeit von vielen (“the work of many”); 2.) with the numeral genitives zweier and dreier (see lemmas); 3.) with proper nouns, particularly geographical names: die Kirchen Roms = die Kirchen von Rom (“the churches of Rome”); 4.) with common nouns preceded only by an adjective: die Rechte kleiner Kinder = die Rechte von kleinen Kindern (“small children’s rights”).
The replacement is colloquial in most other cases. Any possessive or partitive genitive can, per se, be replaced with a von-phrase, which is normal in speech, and virtually obligatory in colloquial speech. In formal writing, however, it is generally considered incorrect and unusual. This is one of the gravest grammatical differences between colloquial and literary German.
  • In older usage, Latin nouns often occurred in the ablative case after von. This is now archaic, Latin case inflections never being used in contemporary German.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈvon/
  • Hyphenation: von

Etymology 1[edit]

This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology.

Verb[edit]

von

  1. to pull
  2. to cover
  3. to draw
Conjugation[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
In expressions
With verb prefixes

Etymology 2[edit]

This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology.

Noun[edit]

von

  1. won (currency)

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse ván.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

von f (genitive singular vonar, nominative plural vonir)

  1. hope, expectation

Declension[edit]


Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

von

  1. rafsi of vo.

Romani[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

von (personal)

  1. they

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Direct loan from German von.

Preposition[edit]

von

  1. of; only used in surnames of nobility
    Carl von Linné
    Carl Linnaeus

Synonyms[edit]