bus

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English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

A bus (motor vehicle).

Etymology[edit]

Shortening of omnibus, from Latin omnibus (for everything/all); dative plural of omnis (all). The electrical sense is derived from figurative application of the automotive sense.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bus (plural buses or busses)

  1. (automotive) A motor vehicle for transporting large numbers of people along roads.
  2. An electrical conductor or interface serving as a common connection for two or more circuits or components.
  3. (medical industry, slang) An ambulance.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

bus (third-person singular simple present busses or buses, present participle bussing or busing, simple past and past participle bussed or bused)

  1. (transitive, automotive, transport) To transport via a motor bus.
  2. (transitive, automotive, transport, chiefly US) To transport students to school, often to a more distant school for the purposes of achieving racial integration.
  3. (intransitive, automotive, transport) To travel by bus.
  4. (transitive, US, food service) To clear meal remains from.
    He bussed tables as the restaurant emptied out.
  5. (intransitive, US, food service) To work at clearing the remains of meals from tables or counters; to work as a busboy.
    He’s been bussing for minimum wage.

Usage notes[edit]

The Canadian Oxford Dictionary only presents the spellings buses, busing, and bused, implying that these are the predominant forms in Canada.

Derived terms[edit]

  • (clear meal remains): busboy

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Noun[edit]

bus (plural busse, diminutive bussie)

  1. (automotive) bus

Catalan[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Cognate to Spanish buso (underwater snail) and Portuguese búzio (underwater snail), from Latin būcina (horn).

Noun[edit]

bus m, f (plural bussos)

  1. diver

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably from Old Norse buza (big wide ship).

Noun[edit]

bus m (plural bussos)

  1. (archaic) A large sailing ship used in the 12th and 13th centuries, broad of beam and with two or three masts.

Etymology 3[edit]

Probably from Persian بوس (bus, kiss).

Noun[edit]

bus m (plural busos)

  1. (archaic) flattery
Usage notes[edit]

Only found in the phrase fer lo bus (to kiss up).

Etymology 4[edit]

Reduction of autobús

Noun[edit]

bus m (plural busos)

  1. bus (vehicle)

Etymology 5[edit]

From English bus.

Noun[edit]

bus m (plural busos)

  1. bus (electrical connector)

Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

bus m

  1. bus (motor vehicle for transporting large numbers of people along roads)

Synonyms[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Shortening of omnibus, from French omnibus, from Latin omnibus (for all), dative plural of omnis (all).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bus c (singular definite bussen, plural indefinite busser)

  1. bus, coach

Inflection[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Shortening of omnibus, from Latin omnibus (for everything/all); dative plural of omnis (all).

Noun[edit]

bus m (plural bussen, diminutive busje n)

  1. (transport) bus, omnibus (vehicle)
  2. (transport, in diminutive) minibus, minivan
  3. bus (electrical conductor)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Dutch *bussa, from Proto-Germanic *buhsijōn, *buhsuz. Compare German Büchse.

Noun[edit]

bus f (plural bussen, diminutive busje n)

  1. container, box, tin
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

bus

  1. first-person singular present indicative of bussen
  2. imperative of bussen

French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bus m (plural bus)

  1. bus
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Inflected forms.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bus

  1. first-person singular past historic of boire
  2. second-person singular past historic of boire

Verb[edit]

bus m pl

  1. masculine plural past participle of boire

External links[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English bus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bus m (genitive bus, nominative plural busanna)

  1. bus

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bus bhus mbus
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Jèrriais[edit]

Verb[edit]

bus

  1. first-person singular preterite of baithe

Lithuanian[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bùs

  1. third-person singular future tense of būti.
  2. third-person plural future tense of būti.
  3. third-person singular future tense of busti.
  4. third-person plural future tense of busti.

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

bus

  1. rafsi of bu.

Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *beu- (to swell, bulge).

Noun[edit]

bus ?

  1. lip

Romagnol[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bus m

  1. hole
    • September 2012, Daniela Cortesi, Bônanòta in la Ludla, il Papiro, page 15:
      un sorg e’ cor in priscia int e’ su bus.
      a mouse runs hastily towards its hole.

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowing from English bus.

Noun[edit]

bus m (genitive bus, plural busaichean)

  1. bus

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Irish bus.

Noun[edit]

bus m (genitive buis, plural buis or busan)

  1. pout (facial expression)

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English bus.

Noun[edit]

bus m (plural buses)

  1. (Latin America) bus

Related terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the verb busa (to do mischief).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bus n (uncountable)

  1. very innocent mischief, prank
    Trick or Treat is often translated with Bus eller godis
  2. general noise or trouble made by gangs of youths

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Tagalog[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English bus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bus

  1. bus (vehicle)

Related terms[edit]


Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English bush.

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Noun[edit]

bus

  1. bush (remote rural areas)
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, Genesis 1:25 (translation here):
      God i kamapim ol kain kain animal bilong ples na ol bikpela na liklik animal bilong bus. God i lukim olgeta dispela samting i gutpela, na em i amamas.


This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. Tok Pisin is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

Derived terms[edit]