lip

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See also: lip-

English[edit]

Lips.

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English lippe, from Old English lippe, lippa (lip), from Proto-Germanic *lipjô (lip), from Proto-Indo-European *leb- (to hang loosely, droop, sag). Cognate with Eastern Frisian lip (lip), Dutch lip (lip), German Lippe and Lefze (lip), Swedish läpp (lip), Norwegian leppe (lip), Latin labium (lip), Russian to kiss (to kiss).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lip (countable and uncountable, plural lips)

  1. (countable) Either of the two fleshy protrusions around the opening of the mouth.
    • Bible, Jeb. xv. 6
      Thine own lips testify against thee.
  2. (countable) A part of the body that resembles a lip, such as the edge of a wound or the labia.
    • 1749, John Cleland, Fanny Hill: Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure Part 2
      I twisted my thighs, squeezed, and compressed the lips of that virgin slit
  3. (countable) The projecting rim of an open container; a short open spout.
  4. (slang, uncountable) Backtalk; verbal impertinence.
    Don’t give me any lip!
  5. The edge of a high spot of land.
    • 1913, D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, chapter 12
      They toiled forward along a tiny path on the river’s lip. Suddenly it vanished. The bank was sheer red solid clay in front of them, sloping straight into the river.
    • 1894, David Livingstone, A Popular Account of Dr Livingstone's Expedition to the Zambesi and its Tributaries, Chapter VII
      We landed at the head of Garden Island, which is situated near the middle of the river and on the lip of the Falls. On reaching that lip, and peering over the giddy height, the wondrous and unique character of the magnificent cascade at once burst upon us.
  6. The sharp cutting edge on the end of an auger.
  7. (botany) One of the two opposite divisions of a labiate corolla.
  8. (botany) The distinctive petal of the Orchis family.
  9. (zoology) One of the edges of the aperture of a univalve shell.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

lip (third-person singular simple present lips, present participle lipping, simple past and past participle lipped)

  1. To touch with the lips; to kiss or lick; to lap the lips against something.
    • Praed
      The bubble on the wine which breaks / Before you lip the glass.
    • Shakespeare
      A hand that kings / Have lipped and trembled kissing.
  2. To utter verbally.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Keats to this entry?)
  3. To simulate speech merely by lip-movement, as suffices for a lip-reader.
  4. (sports) to make a golf ball hit the lip of the cup, without dropping in.

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lip f (plural lippen, diminutive lipje n)

  1. lip (part of the mouth)
  2. lip (of a container)

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Gallo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

lip ? (plural lips)

  1. lip

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lip m (diminutive lipk)

  1. glue, birdlime

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

lip

  1. second-person singular imperative of lipaś

Synonyms[edit]


Polish[edit]

Noun[edit]

lip

  1. Genitive plural of lipa.

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *lěpъ.

Adjective[edit]

lip

  1. (Chakavian, Ikavian) nice, pretty

Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

English leaf

Noun[edit]

lip

  1. leaf
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, Genesis 1:30 (translation here):
      Tasol mi givim ol grinpela lip na gras samting olsem kaikai bilong olgeta bikpela na liklik animal na bilong olgeta pisin.” Orait ol dispela samting i kamap olsem God i tok.


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