-u

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Esperanto[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

  • Perhaps from the Greek -ou imperative (pronounced [u]) of deponent verbs such as dekhou "receive!", or from the Hebrew imperative -û. It may instead—or also—be connected to the vowel of the Esperanto conditional suffix -us, minus the s of the indicative inflections.

Suffix[edit]

-u

  1. do [it]! (jussive inflection of verbs.)
    Parolu! ― Speak!

Etymology 2[edit]

  • Apparently connected to the u at the end of unu (one, a certain).

Suffix[edit]

-u

  1. -one. (Ending of the individual correlatives.)
    kiu (what individual, who)
    tiu (that individual, that one)
    ĉiu (all individuals, everyone)
    iu (some individual, someone)
    neniu (no individual, nobody)
    (nonce) aliu (another individual, someone else)

Finnish[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-u (front vowel harmony variant -y)

  1. Forms nouns from verbs. Most common with e- and i-stem verbs.
    hyppiä (to be jumping) → hyppy (jump)
    itkeä (to cry) → itku (cry(ing))
    pestä (to wash) → pesu (wash(ing))
    potkia (to kick) → potku (kick)
    urheilla (to practice sport) → urheilu (sport)
  2. Derives a number of nouns from other nouns.
    silmä (eye) → silmu (bud)
    sisä- (inside) → sisu (determination, perseverance)

Usage notes[edit]

The front-harmonic variant -y is only used when the first vowel of the word is one of the harmonic front vowels y, ä, ö; words beginning with neutral front vowels e, i take the back-harmonic variant.

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin -utum (accusative of -utus).[1] Cognate to Italian -uto (as in barbuto) and Spanish -udo (as in barbudo).

Suffix[edit]

-u

  1. Forming adjectives having the sense of ‘having quality of, being provided of’ (the root word).
    barbe (beard) → barbu (bearded)
    ventre (belly) → ventru (pot-bellied, rounded)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ -u, -ue; in: Jacqueline Picoche, Jean-Claude Rolland, Dictionnaire étymologique du français, Paris 2009, Dictionnaires Le Robert

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

-u

  1. Romanization of -𐌿

Maltese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic ـهُ (-hu).

Pronoun[edit]

-u m

  1. him, it

Usage notes[edit]

  • Affixed to the verb directly:
qatel (he killed) + -uqatlu (he killed him)

Related terms[edit]


Maori[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-u

  1. Used in contractions with particles of possession to mean you

See also[edit]


Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From suppletive fusion of Old English feminine ending -u, -o and Proto-Germanic *-į̄ (feminine abstract ending). Akin to Gothic feminine abstracts in -𐌴𐌹 (-ei) (compare 𐌼𐌹𐌺𐌹𐌻𐌴𐌹 (mikilei, greatness); 𐌳𐌹𐌿𐍀𐌴𐌹 (diupei, depth)).

Suffix[edit]

-u f

  1. ending used to form abstract nouns from adjectives (compare Modern English -ness), often causing i-mutation, and remaining even when preceded by a long syllable
    eald (old) → ieldu (age)
    hāliġ (holy, sacred; pious) → hāligu (holiness)
    hāl (sound, healthy, intact) → hǣlu (wholeness, health)
    hāt (hot) → hǣtu (heat, warmth)
    mennisc (human, natural, humane) → menniscu (humanity)
    miċel (big, large; great) → miċelu (greatness, size)

Declension[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

In later Old English, -u became -o and the declension altered to reflect the following paradigm