mint

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English minten, from Old English myntan (to mean, intend, purpose, determine, resolve), from Proto-Germanic *muntaną, *muntijaną (to think, consider), from Proto-Indo-European *men-, *mnā- (to think). Cognate with Eastern Frisian mintsje, muntsje (to aim, target), Dutch munten (to aim at, target), Dutch monter (cheerful, gladsome, spry), Gothic 𐌼𐌿𐌽𐍃 (muns, thought, opinion), Old English munan (to be mindful of, consider, intend). More at mind.

Verb[edit]

mint (third-person singular simple present mints, present participle minting, simple past and past participle minted)

  1. (intransitive, provincial, Northern England, Scotland) To try, attempt; take aim.
  2. (transitive, provincial, Northern England, Scotland) To try, attempt, endeavor; to take aim at; to try to hit; to purpose.
  3. (intransitive, chiefly Scotland) To hint; suggest; insinuate.

Noun[edit]

mint (plural mints)

  1. (provincial, Northern England, Scotland) Intent, purpose; an attempt, try; effort, endeavor.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English mynt, münet (money, coin), from Old English mynet (coin, money), from Proto-Germanic *munitą, *munitō (coin), from Latin monēta (place for making coins, coined money), from the temple of Juno Moneta (named for Monēta mother of the Muses), where coins were made; akin to Dutch munt (currency, coin, mint), German Münze (coin, coinage, mint), Danish mønt (coin), and to Russian монета (moneta, coin).

Noun[edit]

mint (plural mints)

  1. A building or institution where money (originally, only coins) is produced under government licence.
  2. (informal) A large amount of money. A vast sum or amount, etc.
    That house is worth a mint
    It must have cost a mint to produce!
  3. (figuratively) Any place regarded as a source of unlimited supply; the supply itself.
    • Shakespeare
      A mint of phrases in his brain.
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

mint (third-person singular simple present mints, present participle minting, simple past and past participle minted)

  1. (transitive) To reproduce (coins), usually en masse, under licence.
  2. To invent; to forge; to fabricate; to fashion.
    • Francis Bacon
      titles [] of such natures as may be easily minted
Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mint (not comparable)

  1. Of condition, as new.
    in mint condition.
  2. (numismatics) In near-perfect condition; uncirculated.
  3. (philately) Unused with original gum; as issued originally.
  4. (slang) Very good.
    that's mint
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

A mint plant.

From Latin menta (the plant), from Ancient Greek μίνθη (mínthē), akin to Old Norse minta (mint).

Noun[edit]

mint (plural mints)

  1. Any of several plants of the family Lamiaceae, typically aromatic with square stems.
  2. The flavouring of the plant, either a sweet, a jelly or sauce.
  3. A green colour, like that of mint.
    mint colour:    
  4. A mint-flavored candy, often eaten to sweeten the smell of the breath.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mint (comparative minter, superlative mintest)

  1. Of a green colour, like that of the mint plant.
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See also[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

mint

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of minnen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of minnen

Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

mint

  1. (comparison) than, as ... as
    A kastély nagyobb, mint a kutyaház. - The castle is bigger than the dog-house.
    Olyan nagy a házam, mint a tiéd. - My house is as big as yours.
  2. as
    János mint zsűritag vett részt az eseményen. - János took part in the event as a member of the jury.

Usage notes[edit]

In the context of comparison, mint starts a new clause, so a comma is needed before it.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Expressions

See also[edit]