bent

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See also: Bent

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From bend.

Verb[edit]

bent

  1. simple past tense and past participle of bend

Adjective[edit]

bent (comparative more bent, superlative most bent)

  1. (Of something that is usually straight) folded, dented
  2. (derogatory, colloquial, chiefly UK) Homosexual.
  3. Determined or insistent.
    He was bent on going to Texas, but not even he could say why.
    They were bent on mischief.
  4. Of a person, leading a life of crime.
  5. (slang, soccer) inaccurate at shooting
    That shot was so bent it left the pitch.
  6. (colloquial, chiefly US) Suffering from the bends
  7. (slang) High from using both marijuana and alcohol.
    Man, I am so bent right now!
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

bent (plural bents)

  1. An inclination or talent.
    He had a natural bent for painting.
  2. A predisposition to act or react in a particular way.
    His mind was of a technical bent.
  3. The state of being curved, crooked, or inclined from a straight line; flexure; curvity.
    the bent of a bow
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wilkins to this entry?)
  4. A declivity or slope, as of a hill.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)
  5. Particular direction or tendency; flexion; course.
    • John Locke
      bents and turns of the matter
  6. (carpentry) A transverse frame of a framed structure.
  7. Tension; force of acting; energy; impetus.
    • Norris
      the full bent and stress of the soul
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

Origin uncertain. Apparently representing Old English beonet- (attested only in place-names and personal names), cognate with Old High German binuz (modern German Binse (rush, reed)).

Noun[edit]

bent (plural bents)

  1. Any of various stiff or reedy grasses.
    • Drayton
      His spear a bent, both stiff and strong.
    • 1888, Rudyard Kipling, ‘The Strange Ride of Morrowbie Jukes’, The Phantom ’Rickshaw and Other Tales, Folio Society 2005, p. 121:
      Gunga Dass gave me a double handful of dried bents which I thrust down the mouth of the lair to the right of his, and followed myself, feet foremost [...].
    • 1913, D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, chapter 9
      Clusters of strong flowers rose everywhere above the coarse tussocks of bent.
  2. A grassy area, grassland.
    • The Ballad of Chevy Chase
      Bowmen bickered upon the bent.

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Created in analogy to Dutch ben (am). Modern Dutch bent has replaced the Middle Dutch verb forms bes and best ((you) are (sg.)).[1]

See also verb form bennen.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bent

  1. second-person singular present indicative of zijn; are.

References[edit]

  1. ^ A. van Loey, Schönfeld's Historische Grammatica van het Nederlands, 8. druk 1970, ISBN 90-03-21170-1; §147a

Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɛnt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: bent

Adverb[edit]

bent

  1. inside

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]


Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English beonet, compare Middle English bent.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bent (plural bents)

  1. (archaic, 14th century) Coarse or wiry grass growing upon moorlands.
  2. (archaic, 15th century) An area covered with coarse or wiry grass; a moor.

Derived terms[edit]

  • benty (covered in bent)

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Persian بند (band).

Noun[edit]

bent (definite accusative [[{{{1}}}#Turkish|{{{1}}}]], plural [[{{{2}}}#Turkish|{{{2}}}]])

  1. dam