alma

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See also: Alma and álma

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From colloquial Arabic عالمة (‘ālima), originally a feminine adjective meaning “learned, knowledgeable”, from علم (‘alima, to know).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

alma (plural almas or alma)

  1. An Egyptian singer or dancing-girl used for entertainment or as a professional mourner.

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin anima.

Noun[edit]

alma f (plural almes)

  1. soul

Synonyms[edit]


Azeri[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic almıla, from Proto-Turkic.

Noun[edit]

Other scripts
Cyrillic алма
Roman alma
Perso-Arabic آلما

alma (definite accusative almanı, plural almalar)

  1. apple

Declension[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin anima.

Noun[edit]

alma f (plural almas)

  1. soul (of a living person)

See also[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

alma

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɒlmɒ/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: al‧ma

Etymology 1[edit]

From a Turkic language, compare Azeri alma, Turkish elma.

Noun[edit]

alma (plural almák)

  1. apple
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

alom + -a

Noun[edit]

alma

  1. possessive third-person singular, singular possession of alom

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin *alima from anima.

Noun[edit]

alma f (plural alme)

  1. (literary) soul

Anagrams[edit]


Ladino[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin anima.

Noun[edit]

alma f (Latin spelling, plural almas)

  1. soul

Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

alma f

  1. feminine singular of almus

Old Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin anima (soul, breath), from Proto-Indo-European *ane- (to breathe, blow).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

alma f (plural almas)

  1. soul

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese alma, from Latin anima (soul, breath), from Proto-Indo-European *ane- (to breathe, blow).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

alma f (plural almas)

  1. soul
    • 1913, Fernando Pessoa, “Ó sino da minha aldeia”:
      Ó sino da minha aldeia, / Dolente na tarde calma, / Cada tua badalada / Soa dentro da minha alma.
      Oh bell of my village, / Lazy in this peaceful afternoon, / Each one of your tollings / Resounds in my soul.

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin anima.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

alma f (plural almas)

  1. soul

Usage notes[edit]

The feminine noun alma is like other feminine nouns starting with a stressed a sound in that it takes the definite article el (normally reserved for masculine nouns) in the singular when there is no intervening adjective:

el alma

However, if an adjective intervenes between the article and the noun, the article reverts to la.

Synonyms[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Verb[edit]

alma

  1. second-person negative imperative of almak
  2. second-person imperative of almamak

Antonyms[edit]