anger

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See also: ånger

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English anger (grief, pain, trouble, affliction, vexation, sorrow, wrath), from Old Norse angr, ǫngr (affliction, sorrow), from ang, ǫng (troubled), from Proto-Germanic *anguz, *angwuz (narrow, strait), from Proto-Indo-European *amǵʰ- (narrow, tied together). Cognate with Danish anger (regret, remorse), Swedish ånger (regret), Icelandic angur (trouble), Old English ange, enge (narrow, close, straitened, constrained, confined, vexed, troubled, sorrowful, anxious, oppressive, severe, painful, cruel), German Angst (anxiety, anguish, fear), Latin angō (squeeze, choke, vex), Albanian ang (fear, anxiety, pain, nightmare), Avestan angra (angra, destructive), Ancient Greek ἄγχω (ánkhō, I squeeze, strangle), Sanskrit अंहु (aṁhu, anxiety, distress). Also compare anguish, anxious, quinsy, and perhaps to awe and ugly. The word seems to have originally meant “to choke, squeeze”.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

anger (countable and uncountable, plural angers)

  1. A strong feeling of displeasure, hostility or antagonism towards someone or something, usually combined with an urge to harm.
    • 2013 June 28, Joris Luyendijk, “Our banks are out of control”, The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 3, page 21: 
      Seeing the British establishment struggle with the financial sector is like watching an alcoholic […].  Until 2008 there was denial over what finance had become. When a series of bank failures made this impossible, there was widespread anger, leading to the public humiliation of symbolic figures.
    You need to control your anger.
  2. (obsolete) Pain or stinging.
    • 1660, Simon Patrick, Mensa mystica, published 1717, page 322:
      It heals the Wounds that Sin hath made; and takes away the Anger of the Sore; []
    • Temple
      I made the experiment, setting the moxa where [] the greatest anger and soreness still continued.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

anger (third-person singular simple present angers, present participle angering, simple past and past participle angered)

  1. (transitive) To cause such a feeling of antagonism.
    Don't anger me.
  2. (intransitive) To become angry.
    You anger too easily.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • anger in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911
  • Notes:
  1. ^ anger in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse angr.

Noun[edit]

anger (definite singular Bokmål: angeren m; Nynorsk: angeren m; uncountable)

  1. remorse, contrition, repentance, penitence

Derived terms[edit]

Compounds[edit]

References[edit]

  • “anger” in The Bokmål Dictionary / The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Swedish[edit]

Verb[edit]

anger

  1. present tense of ange.