rage

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See also: Rage

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old French raige, rage (French: rage), from Medieval Latin rabia, from Latin rabies (anger fury).

Noun[edit]

rage (plural rages)

  1. Violent uncontrolled anger.
    • 1879, Richard Jefferies, chapter 1, The Amateur Poacher:
      They burned the old gun that used to stand in the dark corner up in the garret, close to the stuffed fox that always grinned so fiercely. Perhaps the reason why he seemed in such a ghastly rage was that he did not come by his death fairly. Otherwise his pelt would not have been so perfect.
  2. A current fashion or fad.
    Miniskirts were all the rage back then.
  3. (obsolete) Any vehement passion.

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Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

rage (third-person singular simple present rages, present participle raging, simple past and past participle raged)

  1. (intransitive) To act or speak in heightened anger.
  2. (intransitive) (sometimes figuratively) To move with great violence, as a storm etc.
    • John Milton (1608-1674)
      The madding wheels / Of brazen chariots raged; dire was the noise.
    • 1892, James Yoxall, chapter 5, The Lonely Pyramid:
      The desert storm was riding in its strength; the travellers lay beneath the mastery of the fell simoom. [] Roaring, leaping, pouncing, the tempest raged about the wanderers, drowning and blotting out their forms with sandy spume.
    • 1922, Virginia Woolf, Jacob's Room Chapter 1
      "The two women murmured over the spirit-lamp, plotting the eternal conspiracy of hush and clean bottles while the wind raged and gave a sudden wrench at the cheap fastenings.
    • 2012 October 31, David M. Halbfinger, "[1]," New York Times (retrieved 31 October 2012):
      Though the storm raged up the East Coast, it has become increasingly apparent that New Jersey took the brunt of it.
    • 2014 June 24, “Google Glass go on sale in the UK for £1,000”, The Guardian:
      Debate has raged over whether Glass and smartglasses like it have any viable real-world use cases for consumers, or are more interesting to businesses where workers need hands-free access to information.
  3. (obsolete) To enrage.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)

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Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French, from Vulgar Latin rabia, from Latin rabies.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rage f (plural rages)

  1. rage (fury, anger)
  2. rabies

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


German[edit]

Verb[edit]

rage

  1. First-person singular present of ragen.
  2. First-person singular subjunctive I of ragen.
  3. Third-person singular subjunctive I of ragen.
  4. Imperative singular of ragen.

Jèrriais[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French raige, rage, from Medieval Latin rabia, from Latin rabies (anger fury).

Noun[edit]

rage f (plural rages)

  1. rabies

Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

rage f (oblique plural rages, nominative singular rage, nominative plural rages)

  1. rage; ire; fury

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin ragere. Compare French raire.

Verb[edit]

a rage (third-person singular present rage, past participle ras3rd conj.

  1. (of animals) to roar, howl, bellow

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