rag

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: rág and råg

English[edit]

Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Origin uncertain; perhaps the same word as Etymology 2, below.

Noun[edit]

rag (plural rags)

  1. A coarse kind of rock, somewhat cellular in texture; ragstone.
    • 2003, Peter Ackroyd, The Clerkenwell Tales, page 1:
      the three walls around the garden, each one of thirty-three feet, were built out of three layers of stone — pebble stone, flint and rag stone.

Verb[edit]

rag (third-person singular simple present rags, present participle ragging, simple past and past participle ragged)

  1. To break (ore) into lumps for sorting.
  2. To cut or dress roughly, as a grindstone.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse rǫgg (tuft, shagginess). Cognate with Swedish ragg.

Noun[edit]

rag (plural rags)

  1. (in the plural) Tattered clothes.
    • Dryden
      Virtue, though in rags, will keep me warm.
  2. A piece of old cloth; a tattered piece of cloth; a shred, a tatter.
    • Milton
      Cowls, hoods, and habits, with their wearers, tossed, / And fluttered into rags.
    • Fuller
      Not having otherwise any rag of legality to cover the shame of their cruelty.
  3. A shabby, beggarly fellow; a ragamuffin.
    • Ben Jonson
      The other zealous rag is the compositor.
    • Spenser
      Upon the proclamation, they all came in, both tag and rag.
  4. A ragged edge in metalworking.
  5. (nautical, slang) A sail, or any piece of canvas.
    • Lowell
      Our ship was a clipper with every rag set.
  6. (slang, pejorative) A newspaper, magazine.
  7. (Can we clean up(+) this sense?) (poker slang) A card that appears to help no one.
  8. (Can we clean up(+) this sense?) (poker slang) A low card.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

rag (third-person singular simple present rags, present participle ragging, simple past and past participle ragged)

  1. (intransitive) To become tattered.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

Etymology 3[edit]

Origin uncertain.

Verb[edit]

rag (third-person singular simple present rags, present participle ragging, simple past and past participle ragged)

  1. To scold or rail at; to rate; to tease; to torment; to banter.
  2. (UK slang) To drive a car or another vehicle in a hard, fast or unsympathetic manner.
  3. To tease or torment, especially at a university; to bully, to haze.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

rag (plural rags)

  1. (dated) A prank or practical joke.
  2. (UK, Ireland) A society run by university students for the purpose of charitable fundraising.

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Perhaps from ragged. Compare later ragtime.

Noun[edit]

rag (plural rags)

  1. (obsolete, US) An informal dance party featuring music played by African-American string bands. [19th c.]
  2. A ragtime song, dance or piece of music. [from 19th c.]
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]


Breton[edit]

Preposition[edit]

rag

  1. before

Dutch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Old Dutch:rach (spider silk), New Frisian: reach (spider silk), Old Saxon: raginna (rough hair), Old English: ragu (moss). No further etymology. The word must be West Germanic only.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rag n (plural raggen, diminutive ragje n)

  1. spider silk.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From English rag.

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Noun[edit]

rag n (plural rags, diminutive ragje n)

  1. A piece of ragtime music.

German[edit]

Verb[edit]

rag

  1. Imperative singular of ragen.
  2. (colloquial)First-person singular present of ragen.

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Back-formation from ragad. Created during the Hungarian language reform which took place in the 18th-19th centuries.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rag (plural ragok)

  1. (grammar) suffix, affix, case ending

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

rag

  1. rafsi of rango.

North Frisian[edit]

Noun[edit]

rag m (plural rager)

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) (anatomy) back

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rag

  1. stiff, rigid, inflexible
  2. stubborn, obstinate

Derived terms[edit]