bok

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See also: bök, bók, and bøk

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Afrikaans bok

Adjective[edit]

bok

  1. (South Africa, slang) keen or willing.
    "Do you want to go to the movies?" "Ja, I'm bok."

Etymology 2[edit]

Imitative.

Interjection[edit]

bok

  1. The clucking sound of a chicken.
    • 2000, William S Pollack, Todd Shuster, Real boys' voices
      And he says, "Chicken! Bok bok bok bok!" One time I got up and put the controller down and we started fighting.
    • 2004, Andrew Bennett, Nicholas Royle, An introduction to literature, criticism and theory
      So the librarian gives the chicken a book. The chicken goes away, but comes back the next day, goes up to the librarian's desk and says: 'Bok, bok!'

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch bok.

Noun[edit]

bok (plural bokke, diminutive bokkie)

  1. goat
  2. antelope, buck
  3. (slang) also bokkie My lover.
  4. vaulting-horse
  5. blunder

Adjective[edit]

bok (attributive bokke, comparative bokker, superlative bokste)

  1. keen, willing

Choctaw[edit]

Noun[edit]

bok

  1. creek
  2. river

Derived terms[edit]


Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *bokъ.

Noun[edit]

bok m

  1. side
  2. flank
  3. (anatomy) hip

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bok m (plural bokken, diminutive bokje n)

  1. male goat
  2. (gymnastics) vaulting horse
  3. a crane on legs

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

bok

  1. first-person singular present indicative of bokken
  2. imperative of bokken

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *bokъ. Cognate with Upper Sorbian bok, Polish bok, Czech bok, Russian бок (bok), Serbo-Croatian bȍk.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bok m

  1. side (bounding straight edge of an object; flat surface of an object; left or right half; surface of a sheet of paper)
  2. page (one side of a leaf of a book)
  3. (chiefly in the dual) breast (organs on the front of a woman’s chest, which contain the mammary glands)

Declension[edit]

  • Alternative locative singular: boce

Synonyms[edit]


Marshallese[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • MED Phonemes: {bẹkʷ}
  • IPA Phonemes: /pˠɘkʷ/
  • IPA Articulation: [pˠɤ͡okʷ]

Noun[edit]

bok

  1. blister
  2. chicken pox

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • MED Phonemes: {bẹkʷ}
  • IPA Phonemes: /pˠɘkʷ/
  • IPA Articulation: [pˠɤ͡okʷ]

Noun[edit]

bok

  1. bladder

Etymology 3[edit]

From English book.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • MED Phonemes: {bẹkʷ}
  • IPA Phonemes: /pˠɘkʷ/
  • IPA Articulation: [pˠɤ͡okʷ]

Noun[edit]

bok

  1. book

Etymology 4[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • MED Phonemes: {bekʷ}
  • IPA Phonemes: /pˠɜkʷ/
  • IPA Articulation: [pˠʌ͡ɔkʷ]

Noun[edit]

bok

  1. sand
  2. sandspit
  3. sandbar

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse bók, from Proto-Germanic *bōks.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun 1[edit]

bok f, m (definite singular boka or boken, indefinite plural bøker, definite plural bøkene)

  1. a book

Derived terms[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

Noun 2[edit]

bok f, m (definite singular boka or boken, indefinite plural boker, definite plural bokene)

  1. a beech (tree). Alternative form of bøk.

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse bók, from Proto-Germanic *bōks.

Noun[edit]

bok f (definite singular boka, indefinite plural boker, definite plural bokene)

  1. a book

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *bōks, whence also Old English bōc, Old Frisian bōk, Old High German buoh, Old Norse bók.

Noun[edit]

bōk f

  1. book

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *bokъ

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bok m

  1. side

Synonyms[edit]

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *bokъ.

Noun[edit]

bȍk m (Cyrillic spelling бо̏к)

  1. side
    bok uz bok ― side by side
  2. flank
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *bogъ. Other fringe theories exist but are largely unsupported.

Alternative forms[edit]

Interjection[edit]

bok (Cyrillic spelling бок)

  1. (Croatia) hi
  2. (Croatia) bye
Synonyms[edit]

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse bók, from Proto-Germanic *bōks.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bok c

  1. book:
    1. collection of sheets of paper
    2. a work of literature
    3. a major division of a published work
  2. beech

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

book
beech

References[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic bok, from Proto-Turkic *bok (dirt, dung).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bok (definite accusative boku, plural boklar)

  1. shit (solid excretory product evacuated from the bowel)

Derived terms[edit]

Declension[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bok (plural boks)

  1. box

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]