dual

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (abbreviation, grammar): du.

Etymology[edit]

Latin dualis (two), from duo (two), + adjective suffix -alis

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dual (not comparable)

  1. Exhibiting duality; characterized by having two (usually equivalent) components.
  2. Acting as a counterpart.
  3. Double.
    dual-headed computer
  4. (grammar) Pertaining to grammatical number (as in singular and plural), referring to two of something, such as a pair of shoes, in the context of the singular, plural and in some languages, trial grammatical number. Modern Arabic displays a dual number, as did Homeric Greek.
  5. (linear algebra) This word needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
  6. (category theory) This word needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun[edit]

dual (plural duals)

  1. Of an item that is one of a pair, the other item in the pair.
  2. (geometry) Of a regular polyhedron with V vertices and F faces, the regular polyhedron having F vertices and V faces.
    The octahedron is the dual of the cube.
  3. (grammar) dual number The grammatical number of a noun marking two of something (as in singular, dual, plural), sometimes referring to two of anything (a couple of, exactly two of), or a chirality-marked pair (as in left and right, as with gloves or shoes) or in some languages as a discourse marker, "between you and me". A few languages display trial number.
  4. (mathematics) Of a vector in an inner product space, the linear functional corresponding to taking the inner product with that vector. The set of all duals is a vector space called the dual space.

See also[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish dúal (tress, lock of hair), from Proto-Celtic *doklo-, from Proto-Indo-European *dok̑-lo- (compare Icelandic tagl (horse's tail), Old English tægel, English tail).

Noun[edit]

dual m (genitive duail, nominative plural duail)

  1. lock, tress
  2. wisp, tuft
  3. ply, strand
  4. twist, twine
  5. spiral, whirl
Declension[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

dual (present analytic dualann, future analytic dualfaidh, verbal noun dualadh, past participle dualta)

  1. to twine
  2. to braid, coil
  3. to interlace, fold
Conjugation[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

dual m (genitive duail, nominative plural duail)

  1. dowel
  2. knot (in timber)
Declension[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Adjective[edit]

dual

  1. native, natural
    Is dual dó a bheith leisciúil. — He is naturally lazy.
  2. proper, fitting
  3. in the natural order of things
  4. fated
  5. possible
Declension[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
dual dhual ndual
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

dual m, f (plural duais; comparable)

  1. dual (having two elements)

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Noun[edit]

dual m (genitive duail, plural dualan)

  1. birthright

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dual m, f (plural duales)

  1. dual
  2. (grammar) dual