regular

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See also: regulär

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Anglo-Norman reguler, Middle French reguler, regulier, and their source, Latin rēgulāris (continuing rules for guidance), from rēgula (rule), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *reg- (move in a straight line).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɹɛɡ.jʊ.lə/, /ˈɹɛɡ.jə.lə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɹɛɡ.jə.lɚ/
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

regular (comparative more regular, superlative most regular)

  1. (Christianity) Bound by religious rule; belonging to a monastic or religious order (often as opposed to secular). [from 14th c.]
    • 2002, Colin Jones, The Great Nation, Penguin 2003, p. 201:
      A quarter of a million strong in 1680, the clergy was only half as large in 1789. The unpopular regular clergy were the worst affected.
  2. Having a constant pattern; showing evenness of form or appearance. [from 15th c.]
  3. (geometry, of a polygon) Having all sides of the same length, and all (corresponding) angles of the same size [from 16th c.]
  4. (geometry, of a polyhedron) Whose faces are all congruent regular polygons, equally inclined to each other.
  5. Demonstrating a consistent set of rules; showing order, evenness of operation or occurrence. [from 16th c.]
    • 2011, AL Kennedy, The Guardian, 12 Apr 2011:
      April may be the cruellest month, but I am planning to render it civilised and to take my antibiotics in a regular manner.
  6. (now rare) Well-behaved, orderly; restrained (of a lifestyle etc.). [from 16th c.]
  7. Happening at constant (especially short) intervals. [from 17th c.]
    He made regular visits to go see his mother.
  8. (grammar, of a verb, plural, etc) Following a set or common pattern; according to the normal rules of a given language. [from 17th c.]
    The verb "to walk" is regular.
  9. (chiefly US) Having the expected characteristics or appearances; normal, ordinary, standard. [from 17th c.]
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      For a spell we done pretty well. Then there came a reg'lar terror of a sou'wester same as you don't get one summer in a thousand, and blowed the shanty flat and ripped about half of the weir poles out of the sand.
  10. (chiefly military) Permanently organised; being part of a set professional body of troops. [from 17th c.]
  11. Having bowel movements or menstrual periods at constant intervals in the expected way. [from 18th c.]
    Maintaining a high-fibre diet keeps you regular.
  12. (colloquial) Exemplary; excellent example of; utter, downright. [from 18th c.]
    a regular genius; a regular John Bull
  13. Belonging to a monastic order or community.
    regular clergy, in distinction from the secular clergy
  14. (botany, zoology) Having all the parts of the same kind alike in size and shape.
    a regular flower; a regular sea urchin
  15. (crystallography) isometric
  16. (snowboarding) Riding with the left foot forward.[1]
  17. (analysis, not comparable, of a Borel measure) Such that every set in its domain is both outer regular and inner regular.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

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Coordinate terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

regular (plural regulars)

  1. A member of the British Army (as opposed to a member of the Territorial Army or Reserve).
  2. A frequent, routine visitor to an establishment.
    Bartenders usually know their regulars by name.
  3. A frequent customer, client or business partner.
    This gentleman was one of the architect's regulars.
  4. (Canada) A coffee with one cream and one sugar.

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ BBC Sport, "Sochi 2014: A jargon-busting guide to the halfpipe", 11 February 2014

Asturian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

regular (epicene, plural regulares)

  1. regular
  2. fine, OK, average

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

regular (first-person singular indicative present regulo, past participle reguláu)

  1. to regulate

Conjugation[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin regularis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

regular m, f (plural regulares; comparable)

  1. regular
  2. average

Verb[edit]

regular (first-person singular present indicative regulo, past participle regulado)

  1. to regulate
  2. to tune (an engine)
  3. to set (a watch, clock)

Conjugation[edit]

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Spanish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

regular m, f (plural regulares)

  1. regular, steady, even.
  2. fair, fairly good, average
  3. common, ordinary, middling, so-so
  4. (grammar) regular

Verb[edit]

regular (first-person singular present regulo, first-person singular preterite regulé, past participle regulado)

  1. to regulate
  2. to control
  3. to adjust
  4. to put in order

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]