lui

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See also: Lui

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch loy, leuy. Cognate with the Old Norse adjective lúinn “exhausted”, the Latin noun luēs (epidemy) and the Ancient Greek verb λύω (lúō) “I untie”.[1]

Adjective[edit]

lui (comparative luier, superlative luist)

  1. lazy
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Short form of luiden, a variant of lieden.[2]

Noun[edit]

lui pl (plurale tantum, diminutive luitjes n)

  1. men, people
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ de Vries / de Tollenaere, "Etymologisch Woordenboek", Utrecht 1986 (14de druk), ISBN 90-274-3459-X; article lui 2
  2. ^ de Vries / de Tollenaere, "Etymologisch Woordenboek", Utrecht 1986 (14de druk), ISBN 90-274-3459-X; article lieden

Anagrams[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lui (present luas, past luis, future luos, conditional luus, volitive luu)

  1. (transitive) to rent (something from someone)

Conjugation[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *illūi, which is a Vulgar Latin dative of Classical Latin ille (dative illī). The -ui ending in Vulgar Latin illui is due to the influence of cui.[1]

Cognate with Italian lui.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

lui

  1. him, he; the third-person masculine singular personal pronoun used after a preposition, or as the predicate of a linking verb, or when disjoined from a sentence, or as a stressed subject.
    J'habitais avec lui.
    I was living with him.
    C'est lui qui a dit cela.
    It's he who said that.
    Lui, il n'en sait rien.
    He doesn't know anything about it.
    • 1873, Alphonse Daudet, “La Dernière Classe”, in Contes du Lundi
      Je crois aussi que je n'avais jamais si bien écouté, et que lui non plus n'avait jamais mis autant de patience à ses explications.
      I believe also that I had never listened so well, and that neither had he ever put so much patience into his explanations.
  2. Him, her; the third-person singular personal pronoun used as an indirect object.
    Je lui ai donné le livre.
    I gave the book to him/her.
Related terms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1964, Albert Dauzat; Jean Dubois, Henri Mitterand, “il”, in Nouveau dictionnaire étymologique (in French), Paris: Librairie Larousse:

Etymology 2[edit]

see the verb luire

Verb[edit]

lui (intransitive, hence invariable)

  1. past participle of luire

External links[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *illūi, which is a Vulgar Latin form of illī (dative singular of ille).

Pronoun[edit]

lui

  1. he
  2. you (formal)

See also[edit]


Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *illūi, which is a Vulgar Latin form of illī (dative singular of ille). The ūi in illūi is modelled under influence of Vulgar Latin cūi (see Classical Latin cui).[1]

Pronoun[edit]

lui

  1. he
  2. him (indirect form of lui used after a preposition)

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 2002, Giuseppe Patota, Lineamenti di grammatica storica dell'italiano (in Italian), Bologna: il Mulino, ISBN 88-15-08638-2, page p. 130:

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

luī

  1. first-person singular perfect active indicative of luō

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *illūi, which is a form of Latin illī (dative singular of ille).

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

lui (genitive form of el)

  1. his
    Au ceasul lui?
    Do they have his watch?

Declension[edit]

singular & plural
masculine, feminine & neuter
lui

Synonyms[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

lui (stressed dative form of el)

  1. to him

Synonyms[edit]

  • îi (unstressed form)

Related terms[edit]