inn

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old English inn.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

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inn (plural inns)

  1. Any establishment where travellers can procure lodging, food, and drink.
    • Washington Irving
      the miserable fare and miserable lodgment of a provincial inn
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 4, The Celebrity:
      One morning I had been driven to the precarious refuge afforded by the steps of the inn, after rejecting offers from the Celebrity to join him in a variety of amusements. But even here I was not free from interruption, for he was seated on a horse-block below me, playing with a fox terrier.
  2. A tavern.
  3. One of the colleges (societies or buildings) in London, for students of the law barristers.
    the Inns of Court; the Inns of Chancery; Serjeants' Inns
  4. (UK, dated) The town residence of a nobleman or distinguished person.
    Leicester Inn
  5. (obsolete) A place of shelter; hence, dwelling; habitation; residence; abode.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
    • Spenser
      Therefore with me ye may take up your inn / For this same night.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

inn (third-person singular simple present inns, present participle inning, simple past and past participle inned)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To house; to lodge.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
  2. (obsolete, intransitive) To take lodging; to lodge.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Addison to this entry?)

Anagrams[edit]


Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

inn

  1. Romanization of 𐌹𐌽𐌽

Icelandic[edit]

Adverb[edit]

inn

  1. in, inside
    Hvenær komumst við inn?
    When can we get inside?

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Adverb[edit]

inn

  1. in

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse inn.

Preposition[edit]

inn

  1. in, into
    Dei gjekk inn i hòla.
    They walked into the cave.

Adverb[edit]

inn

  1. inside (usually a building)
    Lat oss gå inn.
    Let's go inside.

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably from inne (in, inside).

Noun[edit]

inn n

  1. inn

Old Norse[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *jainaz (that over there, yon). Cognate with Old English ġeon, Old Frisian jen, jena, Old High German jēner, Gothic 𐌾𐌰𐌹𐌽𐍃 (jains).

Article[edit]

inn (feminine in, neuter it)

  1. the (definite article)

Declension[edit]