inna

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See also: Inna

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

inna

  1. Romanization of 𐌹𐌽𐌽𐌰

Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Article[edit]

inna (triggers prothesis of an unwritten /h/ before a vowel in the feminine genitive singular, in the feminine and neuter nominative plural, and in the accusative plural; triggers eclipsis in the genitive plural)

  1. the (feminine genitive singular)
    • c. 875, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, Ml. 21c3
      In tan téte a laithe di chiunn cosnaib gnimaib ⁊ cosnaib imnedaib gniter and, do·tét iarum imthánud aidche tara hæsi, co ndermanammar-ni inna imned sin i mbiam isind laithiu tri chumsanad inna aidche dod·iarmorat.
      When the day passes away with the deeds and the troubles that are done therein, then comes the alternation of night after it that we may forget those troubles in which we are in the day through the repose of the night that follows it.
  2. the (feminine and neuter nominative plural)
    • c. 875, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, Ml. 27b15
      Inna ancride inna fochaide do·bertar forsin n-aís noib, ad·cobrat-sidi cumscugud fercæ Dǽ do thabairt díglae tara n-ési.
      The cruelties of the afflictions that are wrought on the saints desire the stirring of the anger of God to inflict vengeance on their behalf.
  3. the (accusative plural, all genders)
    • c. 875, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, Ml. 21c3
      In tan téte a laithe di chiunn cosnaib gnimaib ⁊ cosnaib imnedaib gniter and, do·tét iarum imthánud aidche tara hæsi, co ndermanammar-ni inna imned sin i mbiam isind laithiu tri chumsanad inna aidche dod·iarmorat.
      When the day passes away with the deeds and the troubles that are done therein, then comes the alternation of night after it that we may forget those troubles in which we are in the day through the repose of the night that follows it.
  4. the (genitive plural, all genders)
    • c. 875, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, Ml. 27b15
      Inna ancride inna fochaide do·bertar forsin n-aís noib, ad·cobrat-sidi cumscugud fercæ Dǽ do thabairt díglae tara n-ési.
      The cruelties of the afflictions that are wrought on the saints desire the stirring of the anger of God to inflict vengeance on their behalf.

Related terms[edit]

  • in (which see for the complete declension of the definite article)

Old Norse[edit]

Verb[edit]

inna

  1. to accomplish

Synonyms[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *in.

Adverb[edit]

inna

  1. inside
  2. indoors

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

inna

  1. Nominative feminine form of inny.