Nina

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See also: nina, niña, and Ņina

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed into English in the nineteenth century, apparently from several sources. Many borrowings are of Russian Нина (Nina), the name of a Georgian fourth century saint, also known as Nino, of obscure origin and meaning, possibly connected with the Assyrian king Ninus. Others are of an Italian short form of diminutives like Annina from Anna and Giovannina from Giovanna.

Phonologically or orthographically similar names are present in several languages, including Afrikaans, Hindi, Italian, Persian, Romanian, Russian, Spanish and some Native American languages. In many of those, it is a nickname for names ending in -ina or -nina.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Nina

  1. A female given name in continuous use since the 19th century.
    • 1990 Sue Miller, Family Pictures, Harper & Row, ISBN 0060163976, pages 5, 25:
      The first three, Macklin, Lydia, and Randall, were the special ones. Even those names, we thought, showed greater imagination, greater involvement on our parents' part, than ours did: Nina, Mary, Sarah. Clearly by that time they had run out of gas. - - -
      "Nina. Such a pretty, old-fashioned name. I hope you don't mind my saying that." "No; I'm glad you think so."
  2. The Babylonian goddess of the watery deep, daughter of Ea.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Czech Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia cs

Proper noun[edit]

Nina f

  1. A female given name, cognate to English Nina.

Danish[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Nina

  1. A female given name popular in the 1970s and the 1980s.

Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Russian Нина (Nína).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈninɑ]
  • (when perceived as a Swedish spelling) IPA(key): [ˈniːnɑ]
  • Hyphenation: Ni‧na

Proper noun[edit]

Nina

  1. A female given name popular in the 1970s and the 1980s. Variant: Niina.

Declension[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Associated with Ninette and Ninon, French pet forms of Jeannine, Jeanne.

Proper noun[edit]

Nina

  1. A female given name.

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Nina

  1. A female given name popular since the 1980s.

Latvian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

First recorded as a given name of Latvians in early 20th century. From Russian Нина (Nina).

Proper noun[edit]

Nina f

  1. A female given name.
  2. A transliteration of Russian female given name Нина (Nina).

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Klāvs Siliņš: Latviešu personvārdu vārdnīca. Riga "Zinātne" 1990, ISBN 5-7966-0278-0
  • [1] Population Register of Latvia: Nina was the only given name of 969 persons in Latvia on May 21st 2010, including Russian speakers.

Norwegian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Russian Нина (Nina), and from given names ending in -nina/-nine.

Proper noun[edit]

Nina

  1. A female given name popular in the 1960s and the 1970s.

References[edit]

  • Kristoffer Kruken - Ola Stemshaug: Norsk personnamnleksikon, Det Norske Samlaget, Oslo 1995, ISBN 82-521-4483-7
  • [2] Statistisk sentralbyrå, Namnestatistikk: 17 778 females with the given name Nina living in Norway on January 1st 2011, with the frequency peak in the 1960s. Accessed on April 18th, 2011.

Swedish[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Nina

  1. A female given name popular in the 1970s and the 1980s.