complete

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See also: complète

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English compleet (full, complete), from Old French complet or Latin completus, past participle of complere (to fill up, fill full, fulfil, complete), from com- + *plere (to fill), akin to full: see full and plenty and compare deplete, replete. Compare also complement, compliment.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kəmˈpliːt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːt
  • Hyphenation: com‧plete

Verb[edit]

complete (third-person singular simple present completes, present participle completing, simple past and past participle completed)

  1. (transitive) To finish; to make done; to reach the end.
    He completed the assignment on time.
  2. (transitive) To make whole or entire.
    The last chapter completes the book nicely.

Usage notes[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Adjective[edit]

complete (comparative completer or more complete, superlative completest or most complete)

  1. With all parts included; with nothing missing; full.
    My life will be complete once I buy this new television.
    She offered me complete control of the project.
    After she found the rook, the chess set was complete.
    • 2012 March-April, Terrence J. Sejnowski, “Well-connected Brains”, American Scientist, volume 100, number 2, page 171: 
      Creating a complete map of the human connectome would therefore be a monumental milestone but not the end of the journey to understanding how our brains work.
  2. Finished; ended; concluded; completed.
    When your homework is complete, you can go and play with Martin.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 5, The Celebrity:
      In the eyes of Mr. Farquhar Fenelon Cooke the apotheosis of the Celebrity was complete. The people of Asquith were not only willing to attend the house-warming, but had been worked up to the pitch of eagerness. The Celebrity as a matter of course was master of ceremonies.
  3. Generic intensifier.
    He is a complete bastard!
    It was a complete shock when he turned up on my doorstep.
    Our vacation was a complete disaster.
  4. (analysis, Of a metric space) in which every Cauchy sequence converges.
  5. (algebra, Of a lattice) in which every set with a lower bound has a greatest lower bound.
  6. (mathematics, Of a category) in which all small limits exist.
  7. (logic, of a proof system of a formal system)   With respect to a given semantics, that any well-formed formula which is (semantically) valid must also be provable.[1]
    • Gödel's first incompleteness theorem showed that Principia could not be both consistent and complete. According to the theorem, for every sufficiently powerful logical system (such as Principia), there exists a statement G that essentially reads, "The statement G cannot be proved." Such a statement is a sort of Catch-22: if G is provable, then it is false, and the system is therefore inconsistent; and if G is not provable, then it is true, and the system is therefore incomplete.WP

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sainsbury, Mark [2001] Logical Forms : An Introduction to Philosophical Logic. Blackwell Publishing, Hong Kong (2010), p. 358.

Statistics[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Adjective[edit]

complete (comparative plus complete, superlative le plus complete)

  1. complete

Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

complete f pl

  1. feminine plural of completo

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

complēte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of compleō

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

complete

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of completar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of completar
  3. first-person singular imperative of completar
  4. third-person singular imperative of completar

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

complete

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of completar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of completar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of completar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of completar.