wen

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See also: Wen, wên, wēn, wén, wěn, and wèn

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: wĕn, IPA(key): /wɛn/
  • Rhymes: -ɛn
  • Homophone: when (in accents with the wine-whine merger)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English wenn. Cognate with Middle Low German wene, Dutch wen.

Noun[edit]

wen (plural wens)

  1. A cyst on the skin.
    • 1854, Henry David Thoreau, Walden, Walden:
      When I have met an immigrant tottering under a bundle which contained his all--looking like an enormous wen which had grown out of the nape of his neck--I have pitied him, not because that was his all, but because he had all that to carry.
    • 1973, Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow:
      Creeps, foreigners with tinted, oily skin, wens, sties, cysts, wheezes, bad teeth, limps, staring or—worse—with Strange Faraway Smiles.
    • 1996, David Foster Wallace, Infinite Jest, Abacus 2013, p. 4:
      I am debating whether to risk scratching the right side of my jaw, where there is a wen.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English wynn

Noun[edit]

wen (plural wens)

  1. a runic letter later replaced by w

Anagrams[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

wen

  1. An enormously congested city.

Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch winnen.

Verb[edit]

wen (present wen, present participle wennende, past participle gewen)

  1. to win

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *hwannē. Cognate with English when, German wann.

Adverb[edit]

wen

  1. (archaic) when
    En ik dacht aan den geur harer bloesems, aan het huiveren harer takken, aan den zang harer vogelen; en ik vroeg mij: wen rieken wij die? (V. Someren, 1822)
    And I thought about the scent of her blossoms, at the shuddering of her branches, at the songs of her birds, and I asked myself: when do we smell these?

Conjunction[edit]

wen

  1. (archaic) when
    Daar heb ik wen de vogels vlogen, heimelik in elk nest geschouwd! (L. De Mont, 1880)
    There have I, when the birds flew, looked privily in each nest!

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

wen

  1. first-person singular present indicative of wennen
  2. imperative of wennen

Elfdalian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Pronoun[edit]

wen

  1. what

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

wen

  1. (interrogative) accusative of wer, who(m) (direct object).

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

wēn

  1. Romanization of 𐍅𐌴𐌽

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

wen

  1. Nonstandard spelling of wēn.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of wén.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of wěn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of wèn.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Proto-Germanic *wēniz, from Proto-Indo-European *wen- (love). Cognate with Old Frisian wen, Old Saxon wan, Old High German wān (German Wahn ‘delusion’), Old Norse ván, Gothic 𐍅𐌴𐌽𐍃 (wēns).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wēn f

  1. hope, belief
  2. expectation, likelihood

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Adjective[edit]

wen

  1. soft mutation of gwen (white (feminine))

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
gwen wen ngwen unchanged