wer

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See also: wer- and WER

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English wer, from Old English wer (a male being, man, husband, hero), from Proto-Germanic *weraz (man), from Proto-Indo-European *wiHrós (man, freeman). Cognate with Middle High German wër (man), Swedish värbror (brother-in-law), Norwegian verfader (father-in-law), Latin vir (man, husband).

Noun[edit]

wer (plural wers)

  1. (obsolete) A man.
  2. (obsolete) Wergeld.

Related terms[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *hwaz, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷis. Related to wo.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

wer

  1. (interrogative) who
    Wer hat das gesagt?Who said that?
  2. (interrogative, colloquial) what (see usage notes)
  3. (indefinite, colloquial) somebody, someone
    Da ist wer an der Tür. – There's somebody at the door.

Usage notes[edit]

  • In colloquial German, wer and its forms may be used in reference to things (for English “what”). This is often done when asking about a noun of which one knows that it is of masculine or female gender. For example: Kannst du mir mal den Dings rübergeben?Wen? (“Could you pass me the thingamabob?” – “What?”) In this case, the interrogative mirrors the gender of the noun one asks about.
  • The colloquial wer meaning "someone" can only be the first word in a sentence if followed by an adjective: Wer Neues ist in die Mannschaft gekommen. – "Someone new joined the team." Otherwise jemand or einer must be used: Jemand / Einer ist die Mannschaft gekommen. – "Someone joined the team." The reason for this is that the latter sentence could be misinterpreted as a question if wer were used.

Inflection[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Kurdish[edit]

Adverb[edit]

wer

  1. so

Meriam[edit]

Noun[edit]

wer

  1. egg
  2. testicle
  3. star

Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English wer, compare Old Norse verr

Noun[edit]

wer (plural wers)

  1. a man, a husband
  2. Alternative spelling of war.

Verb[edit]

wer

  1. were

Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *weraz, from Proto-Indo-European *wiHrós (freeman). Germanic cognates include Old Frisian wer, Old Saxon wer, Old High German wer, Old Norse verr, Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐌹𐍂 (wair). The Proto-Indo-European root is also the source of Latin vir, Sanskrit वीर (vīra), Old Irish fer (Welsh gŵr), Lithuanian vyras.

Noun[edit]

wer m

  1. man, husband
  2. (poetic) hero
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From werian.

Noun[edit]

wer m (nominative plural weras)

  1. weir

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *weraz, from Proto-Indo-European *wiHrós. Cognate with Old English wer and Old Norse verr.

Noun[edit]

wer m

  1. man

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *weraz, from Proto-Indo-European *wiHrós. Cognate with Old English wer and Old Norse verr.

Noun[edit]

wer m

  1. man
  2. hero

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Selaru[edit]

Noun[edit]

wer

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Blust's Austronesian Comparative Dictionary