ray

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See also: Ray and rầy

English[edit]

Rays from the sun (1)
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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Via Middle English, from Old French rai, from Latin radius (staff, stake, spoke).

Noun[edit]

ray (plural rays)

  1. A beam of light or radiation.
    I saw a ray of light through the clouds.
  2. (zoology) A rib-like reinforcement of bone or cartilage in a fish's fin.
  3. (zoology) One of the spheromeres of a radiate, especially one of the arms of a starfish or an ophiuran.
  4. (botany) A radiating part of a flower or plant; the marginal florets of a compound flower, such as an aster or a sunflower; one of the pedicels of an umbel or other circular flower cluster; radius.
  5. (obsolete) Sight; perception; vision; from an old theory of vision, that sight was something which proceeded from the eye to the object seen.
    • Alexander Pope
      All eyes direct their rays / On him, and crowds turn coxcombs as they gaze.
  6. (mathematics) A line extending indefinitely in one direction from a point.
  7. (colloquial) A tiny amount.
    Unfortunately he didn't have a ray of hope.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

ray (third-person singular simple present rays, present participle raying, simple past and past participle rayed)

  1. (transitive) To emit something as if in rays.
  2. (intransitive) To radiate as if in rays
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Elizabeth Barrett Browning to this entry?)
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Old French raie, from Latin raia.

Noun[edit]

ray (plural rays)

  1. A marine fish with a flat body, large wing-like fins, and a whip-like tail.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Shortened from array.

Verb[edit]

ray (third-person singular simple present rays, present participle raying, simple past and past participle rayed)

  1. (obsolete) To arrange. [14th-18th c.]
  2. (now rare) To dress, array (someone). [from 14th c.]
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir T. More to this entry?)
  3. (obsolete) To stain or soil; to defile. [16th-19th c.]
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, VI.4:
      From his soft eyes the teares he wypt away, / And form his face the filth that did it ray [] .

Etymology 4[edit]

From its sound, by analogy with the letters chay, jay, gay, kay, which it resembles graphically.

Noun[edit]

ray (plural rays)

  1. The name of the letter ⟨/⟩, one of two which represent the r sound in Pitman shorthand.
Related terms[edit]
  • ar, in Latin and the name of the other Pitman r

Etymology 5[edit]

Noun[edit]

ray (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) Array; order; arrangement; dress.
    • Spenser
      And spoiling all her gears and goodly ray.

Etymology 6[edit]

Alternative forms.

Noun[edit]

ray (plural rays)

  1. (music) Alternative form of re.

Anagrams[edit]


Kurdish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic.

Noun[edit]

ray ?

  1. opinion

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French rail.

Noun[edit]

ray (definite accusative [[{{{1}}}#Turkish|{{{1}}}]], plural [[{{{2}}}#Turkish|{{{2}}}]])

  1. rail