defile

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: defilé, défile, and défilé

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English defilen (to make dirty), alteration (due to Middle English defoulen, defoilen (to trample, abuse)) of Middle English befilen (to defile, make foul), from Old English befȳlan (to befoul, defile), from Proto-Germanic *bi- + *fūlijaną (to defile, make filthy). Cognate with Dutch bevuilen (to defile, soil). More at be-, file, foul.

Verb[edit]

defile (third-person singular simple present defiles, present participle defiling, simple past and past participle defiled)

  1. (transitive) to make impure; to make dirty.
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Earlier defilee, from French défilé, from défiler (to march past), from file (file).

Noun[edit]

defile (plural defiles)

  1. A narrow way or passage, e.g. between mountains.
  2. A single file, such as of soldiers.
  3. The act of defilading a fortress, or of raising the exterior works in order to protect the interior.
Translations[edit]
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See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

defile (third-person singular simple present defiles, present participle defiling, simple past and past participle defiled)

  1. (archaic, intransitive) To march in a single file.
    • 1979, Cormac McCarthy, Suttree, Random House, p.138:
      They defiled down a gully to the water and bunched and jerked their noses at it and came back.
Translations[edit]

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French défilé.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /defǐleː/
  • Hyphenation: de‧fi‧le

Noun[edit]

defìlē m (Cyrillic spelling дефѝле̄)

  1. march-past

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • defile” in Hrvatski jezični portal