profane

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French prophane, from Latin profānus (not religious, unclean), from pro- (before) + fānum (temple).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

profane (comparative profaner or more profane, superlative profanest or most profane)

  1. Unclean; ritually impure; unholy, desecrating a holy place or thing.
    • Sir Walter Raleigh
      Nothing is profane that serveth to holy things.
  2. Not sacred or holy, unconsecrated; relating to non-religious matters, secular.
    • I. Disraeli
      profane authors
    • Gibbon
      The profane wreath was suspended before the shrine.
  3. Treating sacred things with contempt, disrespect, irreverence, or undue familiarity; blasphemous, impious. Hence, specifically; Irreverent in language; taking the name of God in vain; given to swearing; blasphemous; as, a profane person, word, oath, or tongue.
    a profane person, word, oath, or tongue
    • Bible, 1 Timothy 1:9
      [] the law is not laid down for the just but for the lawless and disobedient, for the ungodly and sinners, for the unholy and profane []

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun[edit]

profane (plural profanes)

  1. A person or thing that is profane.
    • 1796, Matthew Lewis, The Monk, Folio Society 1985, p. 244:
      The nuns were employed in religious duties established in honour of St Clare, and to which no profane was ever admitted.
  2. (freemasonry) A person not a Mason.

Verb[edit]

profane (third-person singular simple present profanes, present participle profaning, simple past and past participle profaned)

  1. (transitive) To violate, as anything sacred; to treat with abuse, irreverence, obloquy, or contempt; to desecrate; to pollute; as, to profane the name of God; to profane the Scriptures, or the ordinance of God.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, chapter 34
      With one mind, their intent eyes all fastened upon the old man’s knife, as he carved the chief dish before him. I do not suppose that for the world they would have profaned that moment with the slightest observation, even upon so neutral a topic as the weather.
  2. (transitive) To put to a wrong or unworthy use; to make a base employment of; to debase; to abuse; to defile.

Antonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Related terms[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

profane (masculine and feminine, plural profanes)

  1. secular; lay
  2. profane

Related terms[edit]

External links[edit]


Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

profane f pl

  1. feminine plural of profano

Noun[edit]

profane f

  1. plural form of profana

Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

profāne

  1. vocative masculine singular of profānus

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

profane

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of profanar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of profanar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of profanar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of profanar.