vulgar

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See also: vulgär and vulgær

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle English, from Latin vulgāris, from volgus, vulgus (mob; common folk), from Proto-Indo-European *wl̥k- (compare Welsh gwala (plenty, sufficiency), Ancient Greek ἁλία (halia, assembly) εἰλέω (eileō, to compress), Old Church Slavonic вєликъ (velikŭ, great).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vulgar (comparative vulgarer or more vulgar, superlative vulgarest or most vulgar)

  1. Debased, uncouth, distasteful, obscene.
    • 1551, James A.H. Murray editor, A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles: Founded Mainly on the Materials Collected by the Philological Society.[1], volume 1, Oxford: Clarendon Press, published 1888, Part 1, page 217:
      Also the rule of false position, with dyuers examples not onely vulgar, but some appertaynyng to the rule of Algeber.
    • The construction worker made a vulgar suggestion to the girls walking down the street.
  2. (classical sense) Having to do with ordinary, common people.
    • Bishop Fell
      It might be more useful to the English reader [] to write in our vulgar language.
    • Bancroft
      The mechanical process of multiplying books had brought the New Testament in the vulgar tongue within the reach of every class.
    • 1860, G. Syffarth, "A Remarkable Seal in Dr. Abbott's Museum at New York", Transactions of the Academy of Science of St. Louis‎, age 265
      Further, the same sacred name in other monuments precedes the vulgar name of King Takellothis, the sixth of the XXII. Dyn., as we have seen.

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Translations[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vulgāris.

Adjective[edit]

vulgar m, f (plural vulgares)

  1. common to the people, vulgar
  2. ordinary, undistinguished
  3. popular, commonly understood, as opposed to scientific or technical
  4. simple, unintelligent

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Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vulgāris.

Adjective[edit]

vulgar m, f (plural vulgares; comparable)

  1. common to the people, vulgar
  2. ordinary, undistinguished
  3. popular, commonly understood, as opposed to scientific or technical
  4. simple, unintelligent

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Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French vulgaire, Latin vulgaris.

Adjective[edit]

vulgar mn nom/acc forms

  1. vulgar

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Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vulgāris.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vulgar m, f (plural vulgares)

  1. vulgar

Related terms[edit]