vulgo

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vulgo.

Adverb[edit]

vulgo (not comparable)

  1. In the vernacular; commonly known as.
    • 1735, Philip Miller, The Gardeners Dictionary:
      PERICLYMENUM; Trumpet Honeysuckle; vulgô.
    • 1822, George Woodley, A view of the present state of the Scilly Islands, 264-5:
      [Pope's Hole] derives its name from its being a place of shelter to some puffins, vulgo "popes".
    • 1828, John Walters, An English and Welsh Dictionary, page 304:
      A cow desiring the bull [vulgò a tufty cow]

Noun[edit]

vulgo (uncountable)

  1. The masses.

Synonyms[edit]

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vulgus.

Noun[edit]

vulgo m (plural vulgos)

  1. the common people, the masses.

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From vulgus (the public, the common people).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

present active vulgō, present infinitive vulgāre, perfect active vulgāvī, supine vulgātum

  1. I broadcast, publish, divulge, issue, make known among the people.
  2. I make common, prostitute.
  3. I cheapen, degrade.

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

vulgō (not comparable)

  1. generally, usually
  2. universally
  3. publicly, commonly, popularly

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vulgus (the common people), from Proto-Indo-European *wel (to throng, crowd).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vulgo m (plural vulgos)

  1. the common people, the masses

Adverb[edit]

vulgo (not comparable)

  1. vulgarly, in the vulgar language

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vulgus.

Noun[edit]

vulgo m (plural vulgos)

  1. the common people, the masses

Related terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vulgo

  1. (slang) vulgar; of bad taste

See also[edit]