stage

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English[edit]

Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English stage, from Old French estage (story of a building, performance stage, floor, loft), from Vulgar Latin *stāticum (standing-place), from Latin stāre (to stand). Cognate with Old English stæde, stede (state, status, standing, place). More at stead.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stage (plural stages)

  1. A phase.
    He is in the recovery stage of his illness.
    Completion of an identifiable stage of maintenance such as removing an aircraft engine for repair or storage.
    • Thomas Macaulay (1800-1859)
      Such a polity is suited only to a particular stage in the progress of society.
    • 2013 June 28, Joris Luyendijk, “Our banks are out of control”, The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 3, page 21: 
      Seeing the British establishment struggle with the financial sector is like watching an alcoholic […].  Until 2008 there was denial over what finance had become. […]  But the scandals kept coming, and so we entered stage three – what therapists call "bargaining". A broad section of the political class now recognises the need for change but remains unable to see the necessity of a fundamental overhaul. Instead it offers fixes and patches.
    1. (video games) A level; one of the sequential areas making up the game.
      How do you get past the flying creatures in the third stage?
  2. (heading) A structural area of or with floor.
    1. The area, in any theatre, generally raised, upon which an audience watches plays or other public ceremonies.
      The band returned to the stage to play an encore.
      • Alexander Pope (1688-1744)
        Knights, squires, and steeds must enter on the stage.
      • Charles Sprague (1791–1875)
        Lo! Where the stage, the poor, degraded stage, / Holds its warped mirror to a gaping age.
    2. A floor or storey of a house.
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Wyclif to this entry?)
    3. A floor elevated for the convenience of mechanical work, etc.; scaffolding; staging.
    4. A platform, often floating, serving as a kind of wharf.
  3. (heading) Of a journey or route divided into phases.
    1. A stagecoach, an enclosed horsedrawn carriage used to carry passengers.
      The stage pulled into town carrying the payroll for the mill and three ladies.
    2. (dated) A place of rest on a regularly travelled road; a station; a place appointed for a relay of horses.
    3. (dated) A degree of advancement in a journey; one of several portions into which a road or course is marked off; the distance between two places of rest on a road.
      a stage of ten miles
  4. (electronics) The number of an electronic circuit’s block, such as a filter, an amplifier, etc.
    a 3-stage cascade of a 2nd-order bandpass Butterworth filter
  5. The place on a microscope where the slide is located for viewing.
    He placed the slide on the stage.
  6. A place where anything is publicly exhibited, or a remarkable affair occurs; the scene.
    • William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
      When we are born, we cry that we are come / To this stage of fools.
    • John Milton (1608-1674)
      Music and ethereal mirth / Wherewith the stage of air and earth did ring.
    • 2011 September 2, Phil McNulty, “Bulgaria 0-3 England”, BBC:
      Rooney's United team-mate Chris Smalling was given his debut at right-back and was able to adjust to the international stage in relatively relaxed fashion as Bulgaria barely posed a threat of any consequence.

Synonyms[edit]

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Translations[edit]

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Verb[edit]

stage (third-person singular simple present stages, present participle staging, simple past and past participle staged)

  1. To produce on a stage, to perform a play.
    The local theater group will stage "Pride and Prejudice".
  2. To demonstrate in a deceptive manner.
    The salesman’s demonstration of the new cleanser was staged to make it appear highly effective.
  3. (Of a protest or strike etc.) To carry out.
  4. To cause to pause or wait at a designated location.
    We staged the cars to be ready for the start, then waited for the starter to drop the flag.
    to stage data to be written at a later time

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]



Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Pronunciation[edit]

Hyphenation: sta‧ge

Noun[edit]

stage m (plural stages, diminutive stagetje n)

  1. probation, induction
  2. apprenticeship

Related terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Medieval Latin stagium, itself from Old French estage: ester +‎ -age (modern French étage)

Noun[edit]

stage m (plural stages)

  1. internship, job that a trainee is doing in a workplace until a fixed date
    Ce jeune homme avait déjà fait un stage de ce genre auprès d’un des ministres tombés en 1827 ; mais le ministre avait eu soin de le placer à la Cour des Comptes. (Honoré de Balzac, Modeste Mignon, 1844)
  2. probation, induction

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Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French stage.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stage m (invariable)

  1. internship

Synonyms[edit]