deck

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See also: Deck and déck

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:

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A ship with deck numbered 8.

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Middle English dekke, from Middle Dutch deck (roof, covering).

Noun[edit]

deck (plural decks)

  1. Any flat surface that can be walked on: a balcony; a porch; a raised patio; a flat rooftop.
  2. A pack or set of playing cards.
  3. (nautical) The floorlike covering of the horizontal sections, or compartments, of a ship. Small vessels have only one deck; larger ships have two or three decks.
    to swab the deck
  4. A set of slides for a presentation.
    • 2011, David Kroenke, Donald Nilson, Office 365 in Business
      Navigate to the location where your PowerPoint deck is stored and select it.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

deck (third-person singular simple present decks, present participle decking, simple past and past participle decked)

  1. (uncommon) To furnish with a deck, as a vessel.
  2. (slang) In a fight or brawl, to knock someone to the floor, especially with a single punch.
    Wow, did you see her deck that guy who pinched her?
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Dutch dekken (to cover).

Verb[edit]

deck (third-person singular simple present decks, present participle decking, simple past and past participle decked)

  1. (transitive, sometimes with out) To dress (someone) up, to clothe with more than ordinary elegance
    • 1919, W. Somerset Maugham, The Moon and Sixpence, chapter 39
      They call beautiful a dress, a dog, a sermon; and when they are face to face with Beauty cannot recognise it. The false emphasis with which they try to deck their worthless thoughts blunts their susceptibilities.
    • Bible, Job xl. 10
      Deck thyself now with majesty and excellency.
    • Shakespeare
      Deck my body in gay ornaments.
  2. (transitive, with out) To decorate (something).
    • Dryden
      The dew with spangles decked the ground.
  3. To cover; to overspread.
    • Milton
      to deck with clouds the uncoloured sky
Usage notes[edit]
Translations[edit]

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

deck

  1. Imperative singular of decken.
  2. (colloquial)First-person singular present of decken.

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

English deck

Noun[edit]

deck m (invariable)

  1. tape deck