correct

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French correct, from Latin correctus (improved, amended, correct), past participle of corrigere, conrigere (to make straight, make right, make better, improve, correct), from com- (together) + regere (to make straight, rule).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kəˈɹɛkt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛkt
  • Hyphenation: cor‧rect

Adjective[edit]

correct (comparative more correct, superlative most correct)

  1. Free from error; true; the state of having an affirmed truth.
  2. With good manners; well behaved; conforming with accepted standards of behaviour.

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Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

correct (third-person singular simple present corrects, present participle correcting, simple past and past participle corrected)

  1. (transitive) To make something that was not valid become right. To remove error.
    He corrected the position of the book on the mantle.
  2. (by extension, transitive) To grade (examination papers).
  3. (transitive) To inform (someone) of the latter's error.
    It's rude to correct your parents.

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Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

correct (comparative correcter, superlative correctst)

  1. correct

Declension[edit]

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French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin correctus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

correct m (feminine correcte, masculine plural corrects, feminine plural correctes)

  1. correct
  2. (colloquial) passable
    • Le restaurant auquel nous sommes allés était correct, sans plus.

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