dart

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See also: Dart and DART

English[edit]

Parts: 1.Tip 2.Barrel 3.O-ring 4.Shaft 5.Collar 6.Flight 7.Protector.

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English dart, from Old French dart, dard (dart), from Old Frankish *daroth (dart, spear), from Proto-Germanic *darōþuz (dart, spear), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰō- (to sharpen); compare Old High German tart (javelin, dart), Old English daroþ, dearod (javelin, spear, dart), Swedish dart (dart, dagger), Icelandic darr, dör (dart).

Noun[edit]

dart (plural darts)

  1. A pointed missile weapon, intended to be thrown by the hand; a short lance; a javelin; any sharp-pointed missile weapon, as an arrow.
    • 1769, Oxford Standard Text, King James Bible, 2 Samuel, xviii, 14,
      Then said Joab, I may not tarry thus with thee. And he took three darts in his hand, and thrust them through the heart of Absalom, while he was yet alive in the midst of the oak.
  2. Anything resembling such a pointed missile weapon; anything that pierces or wounds like such a weapon.
    • 1830, Hannah More, Sensibility, The Works of Hannah More, Volume 1, page 38,
      The artful inquiry, whose venom′d dart / Scarce wounds the hearing while it stabs the heart.
  3. (Australia, obsolete) A plan or scheme.
  4. A sudden or fast movement.
    • 2011 Septembe 24, Ben Dirs, “Rugby World Cup 2011: England 67-3 Romania”, BBC Sport:
      Six minutes later Cueto went over for his second try after the recalled Mike Tindall found him with a perfectly-timed pass, before Ashton went on another dart, this time down his opposite wing, only for his speculative pass inside to be ruled forward.
  5. (sewing) A fold that is stitched on a garment.
    • 2013, The Economist, Nadia Popova
      Somehow she managed, with a cinched waist here and a few darts there, to look like a Hollywood star.
  6. (zoology) A fish; the dace.
  7. (in the plural) A game of throwing darts at a target.
Translations[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English darten, from the noun (see above).

Verb[edit]

dart (third-person singular simple present darts, present participle darting, simple past and past participle darted)

  1. (transitive) To throw with a sudden effort or thrust, as a dart or other missile weapon; to hurl or launch.
  2. (transitive) To send forth suddenly or rapidly; to emit; to shoot
    The sun darts forth his beams.
    Or what ill eyes malignant glances dart? - Alexander Pope
  3. (intransitive) To fly or pass swiftly, as a dart; to move rapidly in one direction; to shoot out quickly
    The flying man darted eastward.
  4. (intransitive) To start and run with speed; to shoot rapidly along
    The deer darted from the thicket.
    • 2010 December 29, Mark Vesty, “Wigan 2 - 2 Arsenal”, BBC:
      The impressive Frenchman drove forward with purpose down the right before cutting infield and darting in between Vassiriki Diaby and Koscielny.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English dart.

Noun[edit]

dart m (plural darts, diminutive dartje n)

  1. dart

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

dart (plural darts)

  1. A spear set as a prize in running. - Geoffrey Chaucer


Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old French, see below

Noun[edit]

dart m (plural dars)

  1. weapon similar to a javelin

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Of Germanic origin.

Noun[edit]

dart m (oblique plural darz or dartz, nominative singular darz or dartz, nominative plural dart)

  1. weapon similar to a javelin

Descendants[edit]


Pennsylvania German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare German dort, da.

Adverb[edit]

dart

  1. there

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

dart c

  1. darts (the game where the competitors throw small arrows against a circular target)
  2. (rare) dart (one of the small arrows in the game of darts)

Synonyms[edit]