aver

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French aveir (French avoir), substantive use of the verb, from Latin habēre, present active infinitive of habeō (I have, hold, keep).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

aver (plural avers)

  1. (obsolete) Possessions, property, belongings, wealth.

Etymology 2[edit]

From French avérer, from Late Latin *advērāre, from ad + vērus (true).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

aver (third-person singular simple present avers, present participle averring, simple past and past participle averred)

  1. to assert the truth of, to affirm with confidence; to declare in a positive manner.
    • 1663, Hudibras, by Samuel Butler, part 1, canto 2
      Chiron, the four-legg'd bard, had both \ A beard and tail of his own growth; \ And yet by authors 'tis averr'd, \ He made use only of his beard.
    • 1819 CE: Percy Shelley, Peter Bell the Third:
      The Devil, I safely can aver, / Has neither hoof, nor tail, nor sting.
    • 1939 The Wizard of Oz (MGM/Warner Home Video)
      As Coroner, I must aver, I thoroughly examined her.
    • 1997 Frederic W. and Roberta B. Case, Trilliums, ISBN 0-88192-374-5:
      Small (1933) avers T. simile to be deliciously fragrant, a quality we have not noticed in our plants.
  2. (law) To prove or justify a plea.
  3. (obsolete) To avouch, prove, or verify; to offer to verify.
Translations[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Related to Late Latin averia (cattle).

Noun[edit]

aver (plural avers)

  1. (dialectal) A work-horse, working ox, or other beast of burden.

Anagrams[edit]


Corsican[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin habēre, present active infinitive of habeō.

Verb[edit]

aver

  1. have

Conjugation[edit]

infinitive aver
present participle avendu
past participle avutu
Present indicative Past indicative Present subjunctive Past subjunctive
First-person singular aghju avia abbia avissi
Second-person singular ai, ha avii abbia avissi, avisse
Third-person singular avia abbia avissi
First-person plural avemu aviamu abbiamu avissimu
Second-person plural avete aviate abbiate avissite
Third-person plural anu avianu abbianu avissinu

Guernésiais[edit]

Verb[edit]

aver

  1. Alternative form of aveir.

Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

aver

  1. apocopic form of avere

Anagrams[edit]


Jèrriais[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French aveir, from Latin habeō, habēre (have, hold, possess).

Verb[edit]

aver

  1. to have

Derived terms[edit]


Ladino[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Spanish aver, from Latin habēre, present active infinitive of habeō (hold, have).

Verb[edit]

aver (Latin spelling)

  1. to have

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Provençal, from Latin habēre, present active infinitive of habeō (I have, hold, keep).

Verb[edit]

aver

  1. to have; to possess
  2. (auxiliary) to have

Synonyms[edit]

Conjugation[edit]

This verb needs an inflection-table template.


Old French[edit]

Verb[edit]

aver

  1. Alternative form of avoir.

Old Provençal[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin habēre, present active infinitive of habeō (I have, hold, keep).

Verb[edit]

aver

  1. to have; to possess
    • circa 1185, Guerau de Cabrera, Ensenhamen:
      Jes gran saber
      no potz aver,
      si fors non eis de ta reion.

Descendants[edit]


Old Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin habēre, present active infinitive of habeō (I have, hold, keep).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

aver

  1. to have

Descendants[edit]


Venetian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin habēre (to have) present active infinitive of habeō. Compare Italian avere.

Verb[edit]

aver

  1. (transitive) to have
  2. (transitive) to possess

Conjugation[edit]