mock

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English mokken, from Middle French mocquer (to deride, jeer), from Middle Dutch mocken (to mumble) or Middle Low German mucken (to grumble, talk with the mouth half-opened), both from Old Saxon *mokkian, *mukkian (to low, mumble), from Proto-Germanic *mukkijaną, *mūhaną (to low, bellow, shout), from Proto-Indo-European *mūg-, *mūk- (to low, mumble). Cognate with Old High German firmucken (to be stupid), Modern German mucksen (to utter a word), Dutch dialectal mokkel (kiss).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mock (plural mocks)

  1. An imitation, usually of lesser quality.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Crashaw to this entry?)
  2. Mockery, the act of mocking.
    • Bible, Proverbs xiv. 9
      Fools make a mock at sin.
  3. A practice exam set by an educating institution to prepare students for an important exam.
    He got a B in his History mock, but improved to an A in the exam.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

mock (third-person singular simple present mocks, present participle mocking, simple past and past participle mocked)

  1. To mimic, to simulate.
    • Shakespeare
      To see the life as lively mocked as ever / Still sleep mocked death.
    • Shakespeare
      Mocking marriage with a dame of France.
  2. To make fun of by mimicking, to taunt.
    • Bible, 1 Kings xviii. 27
      Elijah mocked them, and said, Cry aloud.
    • Gray
      Let not ambition mock their useful toil.
  3. To tantalise, and disappoint (the hopes of).
    • Bible, Judges xvi. 13
      Thou hast mocked me, and told me lies.
    • 1597, William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part II, Act V, Scene III:
      And with his spirit sadly I survive, / to mock the expectations of the world; / to frustrate prophecies, and to raze out / rotten opinion []
    • 1603, William Shakespeare, Othello, Act III, Scene III:
      "It is the greene-ey'd Monster, which doth mocke / The meate it feeds on."
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost:
      Why do I overlive? / Why am I mocked with death, and lengthened out / to deathless pain?
    • Milton
      He will not [] / Mock us with his blest sight, then snatch him hence.
    • 1765, Benjamin Heath, A revisal of Shakespear's text, page 563 (a commentary on the "mocke the meate" line from Othello):
      ‘Mock’ certainly never signifies to loath. Its common signification is, to disappoint.
    • 1812, The Critical Review or, Annals of Literature, page 190:
      The French revolution indeed is a prodigy which has mocked the expectations both of its friends and its foes. It has cruelly disappointed the fondest hopes of the first, nor has it observed that course which the last thought that it would have pursued.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See also[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mock (not comparable)

  1. imitation, not genuine (mock turtle soup, mock leather); fake

Translations[edit]