tough

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English tough, towgh, tou, toȝ, from Old English tōh (tough, tenacious, holding fast together; pliant; sticky, glutinous, clammy), from Proto-Germanic *tanhuz (fitting; clinging; tenacious; tough), from Proto-Indo-European *denḱ- (to bite), nasalised derivative of Proto-Indo-European *deḱ- (to tear, rip, fray). Cognate with Scots teuch (tough), North Frisian tōch, tūch (tough), Dutch taai (tough), Low German tage, taag, taë, taa (tough), German zähe, zäh (tough), German dialectal zach (tough).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tough (comparative tougher, superlative toughest)

  1. Strong and resilient; sturdy.
    The tent, made of tough canvas, held up to many abuses.
  2. (of food) Difficult to cut or chew.
    To soften a tough cut of meat, the recipe suggested simmering it for hours.
  3. Rugged or physically hardy.
    Only a tough species will survive in the desert.
  4. Stubborn.
    He had a reputation as a tough negotiator.
  5. (of weather etc) Harsh or severe.
  6. Rowdy or rough.
    A bunch of the tough boys from the wrong side of the tracks threatened him.
  7. (of questions, etc.) Difficult or demanding.
    This is a tough crowd.
  8. (material science) Undergoing plastic deformation before breaking.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Interjection[edit]

tough

  1. (slang) Used to indicate lack of sympathy
    If you don't like it, tough!

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

tough (plural toughs)

  1. A person who obtains things by force; a thug or bully.
    They were doing fine until they encountered a bunch of toughs from the opposition.

Translations[edit]

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Verb[edit]

tough (third-person singular simple present toughs, present participle toughing, simple past and past participle toughed)

  1. To endure.
  2. To toughen.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English tough; see also "taff".

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tough (comparative tougher, superlative am toughsten or toughesten)

  1. (slang) Alternative form of taff: tough; robust; assertive and not overly sensitive

Declension[edit]

declension with am toughsten
declension with am toughesten