mano

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See also: Mano, manó, and manō

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish mano (hand).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mano (plural manos)

  1. A rolling pin-like stone, used to grind maize or other grain on a metate.

Translations[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin manus, from Proto-Indo-European *man- (hand).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mano f (plural manes)

  1. hand

Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

mano

  1. First-person singular present indicative form of manar.

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish mano, Italian mano, Portuguese mão, French main, from Latin manus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmano/
  • Hyphenation: ma‧no

Noun[edit]

mano (plural manoj, accusative singular manon, accusative plural manojn)

  1. (anatomy) hand
    • 1999, Trans. Edwin Grobe, Mark Twain: Tri Noveloj, [1]
      Vi metu monon en la manojn de tia viro nur se vi deziras lin detrui, tio estas fakto.
      You put money in the hands of that type of man only if you want to destroy him, that is a fact.

Derived terms[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mano (plural manos)

  1. hand

Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia it

mano (a hand)

Etymology[edit]

From Latin manus (whence also English manual, etc.); from Proto-Indo-European *man- (hand).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mano f (plural mani) diminutive: manina

  1. hand
  2. band, company (Boccaccio; v. manus)
  3. round

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

present active mānō, present infinitive mānāre, perfect active mānāvī, supine mānātum

  1. (transitive) I give out, shed, pour forth.
  2. (intransitive) I flow, run, trickle, drop, distil, run; leak.
  3. (intransitive) I flow, diffuse or extend myself, spread.
  4. (intransitive, figuratively, of secrets) I spread, leak out, become known.
  5. (intransitive, figuratively) I flow, spring, arise, proceed, emanate, originate.

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Lithuanian[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

mano

  1. (1st person singular possessive) my, mine

Maori[edit]

Noun[edit]

mano

  1. host
  2. creed

Numeral[edit]

mano

  1. (cardinal) thousand

Mirandese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin manus, from Proto-Indo-European *man- (hand).

Noun[edit]

mano f (plural manos)

  1. hand

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *mēnô, whence also Old English mōna, Old Norse máni

Noun[edit]

māno m

  1. moon

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *mēnô, whence also Old English mōna, Old Norse máni

Noun[edit]

māno m

  1. moon

Declension[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish mano, apheresis of hermano (brother, sibling).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mano m (plural manos, feminine mana, feminine plural manas)

  1. (informal) brother, male sibling
  2. (informal) dude

Usage notes[edit]

  • Do not confuse with mão (hand).

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin manus, from Proto-Indo-European *man- (hand).

Noun[edit]

mano f (plural manos)

  1. (of a person) hand
  2. (of an animal) front foot
  3. (in a game) round; hand
  4. (of paint) coat
  5. (of a clock) hand
Usage notes[edit]

As with other nouns denoting body parts, the definite article la (the) is used to express one’s own hand where English would use a possessive pronoun (e.g. my, your, his, or her). Example: "Lávate las manos, por favor."

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

apheresis of hermano

Noun[edit]

mano m (plural manos, feminine mana)

  1. (slang, Mexico) buddy, friend

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

mano

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of manar.