hypothecate

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin hypothecatus, past participle of hypotheco, hypothecare. This was in turn derived from Ancient Greek ὑποθήκη (hupothḗkē, pledge), from the verb ὑποτίθημι (hupotíthēmi, to pledge as surety).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

hypothecate (third-person singular simple present hypothecates, present participle hypothecating, simple past and past participle hypothecated)

  1. (transitive) To pledge (something) as surety for a loan; to pawn, mortgage.
    • 1943, Raymond Chandler, The High Window, Penguin 2005, p. 12:
      ‘My husband, Jasper Murdock, provided in his will that no part of his collection might be sold, loaned or hypothecated during my lifetime.’
  2. (politics, UK) To designate a new tax or tax increase for a specific expenditure

Usage notes[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]