murram

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

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Noun[edit]

murram (uncountable)

  1. (East Africa, India) Laterite.
    • 1873, Frank Robertson, Engineering Notes, E. & F. N. Spon, page 313,
      142. Floor for natives to be paved if for cots, otherwise to be murram or chunam, say 6″ rubble or concrete, plastered.
    • 1909, Memoirs of the Geological Survey of India, Geological Survey of India, page 845,
      The southern band of schists is also seen on the southern side of the Haladgáon hills in a murram quarry and as a band separating the quartzite and manganese-ore of Gumgáon hill.
    • 1975, William Adams Hance, The Geography of Modern Africa, Second Edition, Columbia University Press, ISBN 0231038690, page 27,
      Laterite or murram, having a tendency to harden upon exposure, is often satisfactory when traffic is light, but it tends to corrugate or break down with heavier use.
    • 1976, Norman Francis Hughes, Institution of Civil Engineers, Manual of Applied Geology for Engineers, Thomas Telford, ISBN 0727700383,
      page xxvi: Murram: Generally iron concretions formed in tropical soils, transitional to, or an early stage of, laterite formation.
      page 73, in figure: Brownish red loam with murram in subsoil
      page 75: In ferruginous tropical soils and ferrallites (Table 10) much iron released in weathering is often redeposited in the form of gravelly concretions locally termed murram. The word ‘laterite’ has been used for two distinct forms of precipitated iron.
    • 1984, Jonathan Kingdon, East African Mammals: An Atlas of Evolution in Africa, Volume IIB: Hares and Rodents, University of Chicago Press, ISBN 0226437205, page 441,
      They are a familiar sight to most travellers of the murram roads of Uganda.
    • 1991, Donald B. Freeman, A City of Farmers: Informal Urban Agriculture in the Open Spaces of Nairobi, Kenya, McGill-Queen's Press, ISBN 0773508228, page 33,
      Tracks and roads were at first rough and rutted, and quickly became quagmires in the rainy seasons before being surfaced first with "murram" gravel, later with tarmac.
    • 1991, Bernard Verdcourt, Boraginaceae, a volume of R.M. Polhill (Ed.), Flora of Tropical East Africa, A.A. Balkema, ISBN 90-6191-354-3, page 108,
      Hab.   Grassland, bushland, often as a weed in plantations, cultivation edges, murram roadsides and other areas of bare soil; (?600–)1140–2040(–?2520) m.
    • 2006, Robert Tripp, Self-Sufficient Agriculture: Labour and Knowledge in Small-Scale Farming, James & James/Earthscan, ISBN 1844072967, page 134,
      The soils vary from sandy, sandy clay and clay to shallow young soils of mainly murram or gravel.
    • Pascal Belda, Kenya, MTH Multimedia S.L., ISBN 8493397873, page 190,
      Kenya's road network comprises 9,000km of bitaminised road, 27,000km of murram all-weather roads, and 27,000km of non-classified roads.

Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

murram

  1. accusative singular of murra