poculiform

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin poculum, "cup", and -form; compare French poculiforme.

Adjective[edit]

poculiform (comparative more poculiform, superlative most poculiform)

  1. Having the shape of a goblet or drinking cup.
    • 1809, William Martin, Outlines of an Attempt to Establish a Knowledge of Extraneous Fossils on Scientific Principles: In Two Parts[1], Macclesfield, Cheshire: Printed by J. Wilson; sold by the author, Buxton; J. White, Fleet-Street, and Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, London, OCLC 8445670, page 128:
      Poculiform (poculiforme) cylindrically cup-shaped, with the base hemispherical, and but slightly, or not at all, spreading or recurved at the mouth.
    • 1830, Jonathan Stokes, Botanical Commentaries[2], volume 1, London: Simpkin and Marshall; Treuttel & Würtz, OCLC 26888476, page 13–14:
      JASMINUM bracteatum [] Calyx pubescent; tube poculiform, subnervose; segments setaceous, erect, as long as the tube.
    • 1866, Thomas Moore, “ASSARACUS”, in John Lindley; Thomas Moore editors, The Treasury of Botany: A Popular Dictionary of the Vegetable Kingdom; with which is Incorporated a Glossary of Botanical Terms[3], volume 1, London: Longmans, Green & Co., OCLC 4447494, page 104:
      A subdivision of the genus Narcissus, including N. capax and N. reflexus, in which the segments of the perianth are semi-reflexed, and the coronet poculiform, about equalling the perianth segments.
    • 1961 July 21, James A. G. Rehn; David C. Eades, “The Genus Opshomala of Serville, 1831 (Orthoptera; Acrididae; Cyrtacanthacridinae)”, Notulae Naturae of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, number 345, page 5: 
      [S]ubgenital plate of male poculiform, narrowly rounded at apex as seen from dorsum []
    • 2013, Freda Cox, “Hybrids, Cultivars, Varieties and Forms”, in Gardener's Guide to Snowdrops, New York, N.Y.: Crowood, ISBN 978-1-84797-562-1:
      Poculiforms Known since the nineteenth century, poculiform snowdrops derive their name from the Latin poculus ('little cup'), and were named by the Revd. Henry Harpur-Crew (1828–1883). The inner segments are elongated so that all six flower segments are generally equal in length, forming a rounded, bowl-shaped flower.
    • 2015 February 7, Val Bourne, “The quiet man of the world of snowdrops”, The Daily Telegraph (London), page G8:
      'The Bride' [a snowdrop variety], found in the early Seventies at Foxcote Farm near Cheltenham, was his first discovery. It's a poculiform (cup-shaped) G. elwesii with six pure white petals of the same length. Like many poculiforms [] it's not a strong grower.

Noun[edit]

poculiform (plural poculiforms)

  1. A variety of snowdrop with petals of the same length.
    • 2013, Freda Cox, “Hybrids, Cultivars, Varieties and Forms”, in Gardener's Guide to Snowdrops, New York, N.Y.: Crowood, ISBN 978-1-84797-562-1:
      Poculiforms Known since the nineteenth century, poculiform snowdrops derive their name from the Latin poculus ('little cup'), and were named by the Revd. Henry Harpur-Crew (1828–1883). The inner segments are elongated so that all six flower segments are generally equal in length, forming a rounded, bowl-shaped flower.
    • 2015 February 7, Val Bourne, “The quiet man of the world of snowdrops”, The Daily Telegraph (London), page G8:
      'The Bride' [a snowdrop variety], found in the early Seventies at Foxcote Farm near Cheltenham, was his first discovery. It's a poculiform (cup-shaped) G. elwesii with six pure white petals of the same length. Like many poculiforms [] it's not a strong grower.