prognosticate

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Medieval Latin prognosticare; see prognostic for more.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): /prɒɡˈnɒstɪkeɪt/

Verb[edit]

prognosticate (third-person singular simple present prognosticates, present participle prognosticating, simple past and past participle prognosticated)

  1. (transitive) To predict or forecast, especially through the application of skill.
    Examining the tea-leaves, she prognosticated dark days ahead.
  2. (transitive) To presage, betoken.
    The bluebells may prognosticate an early spring this year.

Quotations[edit]

1598 1847 1915
ME « 15th c. 16th c. 17th c. 18th c. 19th c. 20th c. 21st c.
  • 1598William Shakespeare, Sonnet xiv
    But from thine eyes my knowledge I derive,
    And constant stars in them I read such art
    As 'Truth and beauty shall together thrive,
    If from thyself, to store thou wouldst convert';
    Or else of thee this I prognosticate:
    'Thy end is truth's and beauty's doom and date.'
  • 1847, Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights, Chapter VII
    ...to-morrow I intend lengthening the night till afternoon. I prognosticate for myself an obstinate cold, at least.
  • 1915Virginia Woolf, The Voyage Out ch. 2
    All old people and many sick people were drawn, were it only for a foot or two, into the open air, and prognosticated pleasant things about the course of the world.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

prognosticate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of prognosticare
  2. second-person plural imperative of prognosticare
  3. feminine plural of prognosticato